Level Up: Pairing Video Games with Children’s and YA Books (Grand Theft Auto)

25 Aug

Level Up- Video Game Book ListsEach Thursday this summer, I’ll be posting a video game and corresponding book list. This is just a fun, personal project that was actually the brainchild of my boyfriend who thought that A) it sounded awesome and B) that there are a lot of parents who would love to have some resources for those kids who would rather be in front of a screen than a book. I’m hoping these titles will appeal to both boys and girls who love gaming and who do love storytelling; they just need the right book to make them readers. Each list will include the Entertainment Software Rating Board’s (ESRB) rating for the game. I know that every family is different, but want to make sure this information is provided as I’ll be offering lists for games for younger kids as well as teens.

Grand Theft Auto (Mature)

GtalogoGrand Theft Auto is an open-world action-adventure video game where players can choose missions to move the story forward, work or side activities with a focus on driving in fictional locations modeled after U.S. cities.  Although this game has more adult and mature themes, it is popular with a number of titles to its name in a varied of platforms.  The books I chose for this list include adventure style books with lots of action and include both titles suitable for a middle school audience and young adults.

Double Vision by F.T. Bradley

Lincoln doesn’t mean to cause so much trouble but ends up being expelled from school and threatened with a lawsuit after a harmless prank is played while on a field trip.  That is, until a secret government agency provides Linc with a proposition.  Role play as one of the agency’s kid agents who went missing and they’ll make the whole lawsuit disappear.  Lincoln’s just a regular kid – not a secret agent, will he be able to hack it in the real world?

Gone by Michael Grant

You’re safe, if you’re a teenager – everyone else is gone, just like that.  No adults and no phones, internet, or television.  And soon the teens start developing new and dangerous powers as they fight for survival in a world with no rules.  Reviewers liken this story to Lord of the Flies with elements of Stephen King.  The first in a series, you won’t want to put down.

Loot by Jude Watson

March’s father dies in a fall during a burglary and March is seemingly left as an orphan until he is reunited with a twin sister he never knew he had.  Between her street smarts and the clues his father gave him, March and Jules are on the hunt for their father’s next heist before his rivals get to it first. And if they do, they’ll have enough money to do what they want rather than being stuck in an orphanage that feels more like a prison.  This is a fast-paced adventure story for fans of the 39 Clues series.

The Ruins of Gorlan (Ranger’s Apprentice series) by John Flanagan

A fantasy option for adventure seekers, Will has always hoped to become a knight, but he ends up as a Ranger’s apprentice, joining the ranks of the secretive group whose sole job is to protect the kingdom from the evil warlord and the beasts that follow him.  Will soon learns that his job as a ranger’s apprentice involves more skill and is more dangerous than he ever could have imagined.  This is the first in a series about a young man finding his way in a world of unexpected adventure.

Stormbreaker by Anthony Horowitz

Alex Rider can’t believe his uncle/guardian has been murdered, until he learns that his uncle worked for Special Operations M16 and was a spy for the British government.  Now, Alex must take over his uncle’s mission and after only two weeks of training, Alex is sent head first into a world he didn’t even know existed.  With action around every corner this is a page-turner you won’t be able to put down.  This is a perfect choice for young teens looking for a fast-paced, James Bond-style read.

Video Game Booklists:

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11 Responses to “Level Up: Pairing Video Games with Children’s and YA Books (Grand Theft Auto)”

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