Where Do I Fit In?: 13+ Realistic Fiction Titles for Ages 13 and up

4 Jul

Summer is here! And that means loads of time for kids to experience books in all their glory. This is also a great time to encourage kids to read the books they choose (without having to worry about school assignments) and to try out new genres that they might be interested in learning more about.

This series will offer titles for toddlers to teens and include a variety of formats. Each week will focus on a different genre and will follow the same format:

  • Mondays – Titles for Ages 3-7
  • Tuesdays – Middle Grade Titles for Ages 8-12
  • Wednesdays – Young Adult Titles for Ages 13+
  • Thursdays – Nonfiction pairings
  • Friday – Recap of the Week

24974996Young Adult

Dear Martin by Nic Stone
“Justyce McAllister is top of his class and set for the Ivy League—but none of that matters to the police officer who just put him in handcuffs. And despite leaving his rough neighborhood behind, he can’t escape the scorn of his former peers or the ridicule of his new classmates. Justyce looks to the teachings of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. for answers. But do they hold up anymore? He starts a journal to Dr. King to find out.” (Taken from Goodreads)

Dumplin’ by Julie Murphy
Willowdean Dickson has always been comfortable in her body as a self-proclaimed fat girl. But when she is surprised to see a new guy interested in her, she starts to doubt herself. She wants to take back her confidence and so she signs up for the Miss Clover City and shows her town and herself something in the process.

Gabi, a Girl in Pieces by Isabel Quintero
“Gabi Hernandez chronicles her last year in high school in her diary: college applications, Cindy’s pregnancy, Sebastian’s coming out, the cute boys, her father’s meth habit, and the food she craves. And best of all, the poetry that helps forge her identity.” (Taken from Goodreads)

The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas
“Sixteen-year-old Starr Carter moves between two worlds: the poor neighborhood where she lives and the fancy suburban prep school she attends. The uneasy balance between these worlds is shattered when Starr witnesses the fatal shooting of her childhood best friend Khalil at the hands of a police officer. Khalil was unarmed.” (Taken from Goodreads)

I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter by Erika L. Sánchez
Julia’s older sister was always the “perfect” daughter, but a horrible accident leaves Jessica without her older sister, trying to piece her family back together. But, maybe Olga wasn’t as perfect as Jessica first thought.

I’ll Give You the Sun by Jandy Nelson
Jude and her twin brother, Noah, used to be inseparable, but now they’re barely talking after something happened. This story is told in alternating viewpoints, but will the twins ever share the whole story with each other and learn to forgive?

The Inexplicable Logic of My Life by Benjamin Alire Sáenz
“Everything is about to change. Until this moment, Sal has always been certain of his place with his adoptive gay father and their loving Mexican-American family. But now his own history unexpectedly haunts him, and life-altering events force him and his best friend, Samantha, to confront issues of faith, loss, and grief.” (Taken from Goodreads)

32078787Long Way Down by Jason Reynolds
Will’s brother is murdered outside their apartment building and Will knows the rules – 1.) No crying, 2.) no snitching, 3.) get revenge. And that’s what he’s planning to do when he gets on the elevator at the seventh floor, but what happens as he makes his way to ground level, may make him change his mind. 

Once and For All by Sarah Dessen
Louna may be cynical of happily-ever-after, but she still works with her mom, a famed wedding planner. Her mom ends up hiring, Ambrose, a serial dater who’s interested in Louna. But is Louna willing to open her heart?

Piecing Me Together by Renée Watson
Jade is going to almost all-white high school on scholarship and is selected to participate in a mentorship program for “at-risk” students. But will Jade’s mentor understand how she feels being a student from a “bad” neighborhood going to school where money flows freely?

Saints and Misfits by S.K. Ali
Janna, a hijabi-wearing Muslim teen dealing with an attempted rape by a boy from her Mosque who most people in her community see as a perfect teen. How can she come to terms with what has happened to her when she’s not sure anyone will understand?

Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda by Becky Albertalli
“Sixteen-year-old and not-so-openly gay Simon Spier prefers to save his drama for the school musical. But when an email falls into the wrong hands, his secret is at risk of being thrust into the spotlight.” (Taken from Goodreads)

35504431The Sun Is Also a Star by Nicola Yoon
Do you believe in fate? Natasha is trying to do everything in her power to prevent her family from being deported in the next twelve hours when she meets Daniel the good son living up to his family’s expectations, but who’s second-guessing what he wants when he meets Natasha. There are a thousand ways this story can go, but what route will they choose?

Turtles All the Way Down by John Green
“Sixteen-year-old Aza never intended to pursue the mystery of fugitive billionaire Russell Pickett, but there’s a hundred-thousand-dollar reward at stake and her Best and Most Fearless Friend, Daisy, is eager to investigate. So together, they navigate the short distance and broad divides that separate them from Russell Pickett’s son, Davis. Aza is trying. She is trying to be a good daughter, a good friend, a good student, and maybe even a good detective, while also living within the ever-tightening spiral of her own thoughts.” (Taken from Goodreads)

 

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2 Responses to “Where Do I Fit In?: 13+ Realistic Fiction Titles for Ages 13 and up”

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Realistic Fiction Booklist Recap | literacious - July 6, 2018

    […] Where Do I Fit In?: 13+ Realistic Fiction Titles for Ages 13 and up […]

  2. Genre Booklists for Summer 2018 | literacious - July 16, 2018

    […] Where Do I Fit In?: 13+ Realistic Fiction Titles for Ages 13 and up […]

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