Book Review – Stubby the War Dog: The True Story of World War I’s Bravest Dog

27 Jan

Stubby the War Dog: The True Story of World War I’s Bravest Dog by Ann Bausum is about an unlikely hero that I had never heard about until reading this informational text.  This orphan dog found himself in good company during basic training on Yale’s campus in 1917.  Did he want to be a soldier?  Maybe, maybe not.  But he definitely learned what bugle call was for mealtime and ended up learning much more besides.  He could march, salute, and learned how to tell military uniforms apart.

After being smuggled onto a ship headed for France, Stubby not only became a mascot of sorts for the 102nd Infantry, but also saved lives – warning the men before gas attacks, artillery attacks, and capturing at least one German soldier.

I couldn't resist - my own pup with Sergeant Stubby!

I couldn’t resist – my own pup with Sergeant Stubby!

The story itself is perfect for a dog lover or lover of history and although stories and accounts of Stubby’s life can vary depending on the individual, he was an extremely important member of the 102nd Infantry as well as a best friend to human companion, J. Robert Conroy.  Throughout the story, pictures and illustrations show Stubby in action, in uniform, and during relaxation.  This is a must-read story (and perfect for the Summer Reading theme this year – Every Hero Has a Story!)

Title: Stubby the War Dog: The True Story of World War I’s Bravest Dog
Author: Ann Bausum
Publisher: National Geographic
Publication Date: 2014
Page Number: 72 pgs.

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