Tag Archives: research

Resource: Library Services for Children Journal Club

6 Oct

lsc-journal-club-logo-v3.pngBear with me as I introduce this story by telling you all how I met Lindsey. Lindsey (and her awesome colleague Dana) have this little website called Jbrary. I’ll wait for you to check out their amazing-ness if you don’t know who they are already. Go ahead, I’ll wait… You’re back? Awesome. So, I had been following Lindsey and Dana through their blog and on Twitter for awhile. We’d share each other’s posts and chat about children’s library stuff, but seeing as they live in Vancouver and I live in Philadelphia, we never met in person. That is, until the ALA Annual Conference in 2014 held in Las Vegas. I went to an open house for ALSC members and as we were playing a get-to-know-you game, I bumped into these two. I (and quite possibly all three of us) fangirled about finally meeting in person. And that is how I met Lindsey (online and IRL).

And, Lindsey just created this amazing new resource for children’s librarians called the Library Services for Children Journal Club. The LSC Journal Club was created to keep children’s librarians informed of research and articles published that pertain to our field and spend time discussing these materials with others. Lindsey will be hosting meetups in Vancouver, but she’s reaching out to bloggers and librarians around the world in the hopes that more children’s librarians create their own meetups – whether that means a relaxed setting with wine at someone’s house or in a staff meeting at work.

I find that many children’s librarians are so busy being children’s librarians, they don’t have time to spend on research and I love to learn more about my field, so any and all journals are a huge help!

I can’t wait to share this great resource with my own staff, but also with our county/consortium because I think it’s going to be super valuable! Check it out!

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Book Review: Mr. Lemoncello’s Great Library Race

15 Jun

31226744.jpgI was so excited to get an ARC of Mr. Lemoncello’s Great Library Race by Chris Grabenstein at BEA a couple weeks ago and bonus – I got it signed! This has become one of my favorite middle grade series for its adventure and library focused scavenger hunts. This most recent title in the series is foucsed around Mr. Lemoncello’s most recent family, fun game – FABULOUS FACT-FINDING FRENZY, but when rumors come out that Mr. Lemoncello stole his very first board game idea from a quiet, little, old lady, the kids join forces to not only win the game, but to clear their favorite game maker’s good name.

I love that as a reader, Chris drops in great titles from literature throughout the text, plus includes a complete list at the end of the book for you to enjoy. The best part for me is the puzzles and scavenger hunt style of the story which I think is very intriguing for kids and a lot of fun to read.

For educators and librarians – you can download your own library scavenger hunt from Chris’s website, he’s more than happy to Skype with classes and library groups and has a host of the great resources on his website.

Twitter Booktalk (140 characters or less): Kyle & his friends play Mr. Lemoncello’s Fact Finding Frenzy game to help clear his good name as they run, ride & fly to find the truth.

Title: Mr. Lemoncello’s Great Library Race
Author: Chris Grabenstein
Publisher: Random House Books for Young Readers
Publication Date: October 10, 2017
Page Number: 288 pgs.

Half Brother

7 Dec

Ben Tomlin was an only child for thirteen years, until the day his mother brought home Zan – an eight-day old chimpanzee.  Ben’s parents plan on raising Zan as a human and to teach him American Sign Language (ASL) in order to see if Zan can acquire advanced language skills.

Ben’s family moves across Canada from Toronto to Victoria during the 1970s in order for his father to complete his research project.  Kenneth Oppel uses amazing storytelling skills to bring this story to life from the science and research to the animal-rights issues, each topic is handled in a way that readers can see both perspectives.  If you weren’t paying close attention the story could be set in today’s time, except for references to Planet of the Apes, the original, not the remake.

In the end, Ben must make a difficult decision  – obey his father, or protect his little brother.  This is well worth the read, for boys and girls alike, especially those interested in animals and science!

Title: Half Brother
Author: Kenneth Oppel
Publisher: Scholastic Press
Page Number: 375 pgs.

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