Tag Archives: read aloud

#ClassroomBookaDay

21 Sep

jillian1.jpgI just recently heard a podcast on Books Between about Classroom Book a Day with it’s creator, Jillian Heise. I love the idea of reading a book every day kids are in school and not only that, but reading picture books to middle grade students. Jillian was inspired by Donalyn Miller and her summer vacation Book a Day challenge – and up-ed the ante to include her students.

I love the idea of teaching about a global perspective, theme, character development and so much more in a very short amount of time and then getting the chance to compare these ideas across a wide array of texts. This idea also promotes visual literacy which is becoming more and more integrated into students’ lives.

As I was listening to the podcast, I thought of a really interesting blog project – Blog Book a Day, if teacher’s can find five minutes to read a picture book during the school day, I should be able to do the same during my day. And it’s perfect in that I have access to a TON of picture books at the library, so I’ll never really have an excuse. So, I’m thinking about hashing out these details to start in January. It sounds like a great project!

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Book Review: It’s Not Jack and the Beanstalk

16 Sep

25753208I picked this book up fully expecting it to be in rhyme because if you don’t know, Josh Funk is the King of Rhyme. But it’s not, which was a complete surprise! I loved Jack’s voice in this book, not willing to have someone tell his own story andI perceived him to be much smarter in this version than in the traditional fairy tale where he thought that magic beans would be the best option when selling his cow and when he decided to steal from a giant (again and again).

In this story he doesn’t want to sell his best friend Bessie, the cow, Jack wants the magic beans to grant him a wish – to get his cow back. While Jack makes his way up the beanstalk, he’s invited to Cinderella’s ball and when he reaches the giant he really, really doesn’t want to die. I won’t spoil the story, but the giant is awesome and such a fun character. The illustrators enhance the story with a style that reminds me of television cartoons with bright colors and fun little hidden homages to other fairy tales in the illustrations, this is story you can’t read just once!

Twitter Booktalk (140 characters or less): Jack’s not happy w the narrator- he doesn’t want to sell his cow for magic beans, climb a beanstalk or get eaten by a giant.What’s he to do?

Title: It’s Not Jack and the Beanstalk
Author: Josh Funk
Illustrator: Edwardian Taylor
Publisher: Two Lions
Publication Date: September 19, 2017
Page Number: 40 pgs.

Picture Book 10 for 10 – Sing Along

10 Aug

Picture Book 10 for 10 - Sing Along.png

There’s nothing as exciting as singing along to a picture book and gaining everyone’s attention – kids love music and song (regardless of how horribly you sing!) and if want to try to get attention in storytime, at home or while babysitting, try singing along instead of just reading – you’ll be amazed! I loved to sing along to books in storytime, it holds its own special power and really engages kids with the book. Here are ten titles that I’ve sang, chanted and loved – enjoy!

  1. If You’re Happy and You Know It: Jungle Edition by James Warhola
  2. Ten in the Bed by John Butler
  3. Down By the Station by Jennifer Riggs Vetter, illustrated by Frank Remkiewicz
  4. I Ain’t Gonna Paint No More! by Karen Beaumont, illustrated by David Catrow
  5. Row, Row, Row Your Boat by Jane Cabrera
  6. Pete the Cat: I Love My White Shoes by Eric Litwin, illustrated by James Dean
  7. The Seals on the Bus by Lenny Hort, illustrated by C. Brian Karas
  8. There Was a Tree by Rachel Isadora
  9. Jazz Baby by Lisa Wheeler, illustrated by R. Gregory Christie
  10. Bee-Bim Bop! by Linda Sue Park, illustrated Ho Boek Lee

pb 10 for 10 015Check out all the amazing lists coming out for this awesome event, Picture Books 10 for 10, hosted by Reflect & Refine and Enjoy and Embrace Learning.

The Grown-Up Joys of Reading Children’s Books – WSJ Essay

9 Aug

After reading the title of this article, “The Grown-Up Joys of Reading Children’s Books” I was excited to see what the author had to say, specifically in regards to what I would expect to be addressed, the diversity of children’s literature in the 21st century and how relatable it can be to both children and adults. Needless to say, that’s not at all what this essay is about, in fact the children’s titles referenced are classic titles that are not new by any stretch of the imagination – Goodnight MoonBedtime for FrancesThe Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe and The House at Pooh Corner.

I enjoyed how the author compared his feelings of the book as a child to his feelings about the book as an adult now sharing them with his own children, but expected to see references of more modern classics or popular titles that are so popular in this time period. Not to say that classic titles are “bad,” but to how newer titles can have just as lasting as an impression – authors like Kate DiCamillo, Christian Robinson, Peter H. Reynolds and Pam Muñoz Ryan and many of these authors and titles bring forward diveristy, tough topics and conversation starters that were never addressed in books published 50+ years ago. Considering the article starts with, “We are living through an extended golden age for children’s books…” I was just hoping for more of a modern look at children’s literature, rather than addressing the same authors and titles that have been discussed before.

The author of the essay, Bruce Handy, is publishing a book on the topic of reading children’s books as an adult entitled Wild Things: The Joy of Reading Children’s Literature as an Adult, published on August 15, 2017 by Simon & Schuster. I’m curious to see if he addresses diversity and more recent literature or if the whole book is focused on classic children’s literature alone.

(Unofficial) Top Ten Tuesday: Picture Book Sequels

1 Aug

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I love to share my book knowledge with families at the library – especially when I get to tell them their favorite stories are part of a series! Check out these great sequels (and trilogies!)

Lady Pancake and Sir French Toast by Josh Funk, illustrated by Brendan Kearney
The Case of the Stinky Stench by Josh Funk, illustrated by Brendan Kearney

Dragons Love Tacos by Adam Rubin, illustrated by Daniel Salmieri
Dragons Love Tacos 2: The Sequel by Adam Rubin, illustrated by Daniel Salmieri

Max the Brave by Ed Vere
Max at Night
by Ed Vere
Max and Bird
by Ed Vere

I Want My Hat Back  by Jon Klassen
This Is Not My Hat by Jon Klassen
We Found a Hat by Jon Klassen

Press Here by Hervé Tullet
Mix It Up! by Hervé Tullet
Let’s Play by Hervé Tullet

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