Tag Archives: programming

Top 10 Most Viewed Posts in 2017

30 Dec

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I had a great year on my blog this year with a lot more views than I was expecting and many on some older content that keeps popping up! Im hoping during the course of January, I can revisit some of these topics and create an updated booklist or make some new recommendations. If you missed any of these great posts, take a second to check them out and thanks for visiting Literacious this year!

10. Storytime Theme: Imagination Station

9. Storytime Theme: Imagination & Pretend Play

8. Storytime Theme: Polka Dots

7. Storytime Planning, so much more than just books!

6. Storytime Theme: Say “Hello”

5. Programming for Millennials

4. Flannel Friday: Bubble, Bubble, Pop

3. Life Size Chutes & Ladders Game

2. Middle Grade Gets Real – 25 Titles About Tough Topics

1. Storytime Theme: Jungle


Teens, Stress & Anxiety

13 Oct

I just recently read an article in The New York Times about the number of teens who are experiencing severe anxiety. And my first thought, was how horrible that so many young people have to deal with what can be a debilitating disorder, but also what can we do, as a library, to help.

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Director’s Thoughts #14 – It’s Been Awhile: Storytime

12 Oct

b8a7c2491785eeb0c506cfc6f7c40d36--nurse-humor-medical-humorThis week I covered a co-worker’s storytime while she was away and after a year of being away from it; it was strange coming back. I did storytime for eight years as a children’s librarian and I think that I made a smart decision to move into another role when I did.

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Director’s Thoughts #13 – Program Evaluation

24 Aug


I’m finalizing our strategic plan that will begin officially in January and our next project to take on is program and service evaluation. It’s definitely a time-intensive, difficult project because people feel strongly about programs and services, what we should keep, what we should get rid of, what we need, what we want, etc.

I’m going to focus on programs right now as I haven’t even begun to think about evaluating the many services we offer. My goal is to first look at a program evaluation model. I want to gather information from the employee creating, planning and presenting the program as well as gather information from the public. My goal is to answer a few questions:

  • Why are we offering this program?
  • How does this program benefit the community?
  • Is this the right time of year to offer this program?
  • Does this program take up too much staff time?
  • What is the ROI for this program?
  • Does this program need to be repeated regularly?
  • Where are there gaps in our program offerings (specific time periods, groups of people, types of programs)?

To answer these questions, I’m working on some sort of evaluation form to write down any input information – time, cost of supplies, staffing, how often it happens, etc. Next, is the output – how many attendees. And finally, outcomes – skills/knowledge developed and social aspect (how is this affecting the community).

I also need to start working on a simple, but effective tool to gather information from program attendees – a short survey that helps us understand what the community is looking for and whether or not a particular program reached it’s intended outcomes.

As I said, this is not for the faint of heart, but I want my staff to free themselves from tired programs that are only happening because we’ve always offered it, to be able to jump on new trends and try exciting new programs (without it meaning it becomes a regularly scheduled program all the time). It won’t be an easy project, but it’s the next step toward moving us into the future!

The Solar Eclipse Experience

16 Aug

Solar_eclipse_1999_4_NRAt this point (especially if you work in a library), if you haven’t heard about the solar eclipse then I want to be you! We applied for the NASA grant and didn’t get it, so my children’s and teen programming librarians decided that we would offer a program anyway and buy some glasses for the program participants. We went back and forth on how many pairs of glasses to order, how popular we thought the program would be, who we could have come in to actually do the program, etc. We were finally able to get one of our middle school teachers to put a program together for us (right before school started and she was kind enough to volunteer her time). We decided to only order enough glasses for the program participants and opened the program up to 40 kids. Well, needless to say, the program is completely filled with an additional 25 kids on our waiting list.

I come into the library yesterday morning, ready to open my office and I seen an email pinned to my door, it’s from Amazon. They’re refunding us our money for the glasses because they cannot verify with the manufacturer that our glasses are properly certified. I have 40 kids planning on coming to a program in less than 36 hours who are expecting glasses. It was not an enjoyable way to start my day.

After hours of searching online, calling local retailers and doing a ton of research, we made our decision. We’d proceed with the program, email the participants ahead of time explaining the situation, provide the kids with instructions and materials to create a pinhole solar eclipse viewer and hope for the best. So far, I haven’t heard any major complaints, but as the director I made the tough call to choose not to hand out our glasses. My librarians did the research and chose the glasses that appeared to be certified (and it says it right there, printed on the glasses), but I don’t want any eye injuries as a result of handing out faulty solar eclipse glasses, so that’s where we stand. Meanwhile, we’re continuing to field calls from community members asking if we have glasses to give away and trying to get into the solar eclipse program that has been full for a month.

I can’t wait for the eclipse to be over.


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