Tag Archives: picture books

Mark Your Calendars!

19 Aug

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I was able to attend the Princeton Childrren’s Book Festival last year and it was so much fun! Tents of children’s book authors and illustrators and books as far as the eye can see. And the best part? People everywhere excited about children’s literature.

I love that Brian Biggs designed the poster this year as I just recently reviewed is Tinyville Town books and fell in love with the fun stories and diverse characters. You can check out my review of Tinyville Town. Take a look at the Princeton Book Festival website to see the list of authors and illustrators attending this year. So if you live in the Princeton, New Jersey area, this is a must-visit festival if you want to meet tons of great authors and illustrators, get books signed and have an awesome day.

20 Titles to Create a Classroom Community

11 Aug

school community

There’s a lot of talk about reading a book a day during the school year, the importance of reading aloud to students and the need to teach and show kids empathy and kindness in today’s world. This is a wonderful list of titles that you can share at any time of year, but would make a great way to start the school year – expecting kindness from every student in the classroom and using picture books to show that expectation.

  1. You’re Finally Here! by Mélanie Watt
  2. One by Kathryn Otoshi
  3. I Wish You More by Amy Krouse Rosenthal, illustrated by Tom Lichtenheld
  4. Ish by Peter H. Reynolds
  5. School’s First Day of School by Adam Rex, illustrated by Christian Robinson
  6. Chrysanthemum by Kevin Henkes
  7. The Invisible Boy by Trudy Ludwig, illustrated by Patrice Barton
  8. Red: A Crayon’s Story by Michael Hall
  9. Be A Friend by Salina Yoon
  10. I Ain’t Gonna Paint No More! by Karen Beaumont, illustrated by David Catrow
  11. Zen Ties by Jon Muth
  12. Hey, Little Ant by Phillip M. Hoose and Hannah Hoose, illustrated by Debbie Tilley
  13. A Sick Day for Amos McGee by Philip C. Stead, illustrated by Erin E. Stead
  14. Wolfie the Bunny by Ame Dyckman, illustrated by Zachariah Ohora
  15. Rude Cakes by Rowboat Watkins
  16. It’s Okay to Be Different by Todd Parr
  17. Last Stop On Market Street by Matt de la Peña, illustrated by Christian Robinson
  18. The Monster Who Lost His Mean by Tiffany Strelitz Haber, illustrated by Kirstie Edmunds
  19. Unicorn Thinks He’s Pretty Great by Bob Shea
  20. We’re All Wonders by R.J. Palacio

Picture Book 10 for 10 – Sing Along

10 Aug

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There’s nothing as exciting as singing along to a picture book and gaining everyone’s attention – kids love music and song (regardless of how horribly you sing!) and if want to try to get attention in storytime, at home or while babysitting, try singing along instead of just reading – you’ll be amazed! I loved to sing along to books in storytime, it holds its own special power and really engages kids with the book. Here are ten titles that I’ve sang, chanted and loved – enjoy!

  1. If You’re Happy and You Know It: Jungle Edition by James Warhola
  2. Ten in the Bed by John Butler
  3. Down By the Station by Jennifer Riggs Vetter, illustrated by Frank Remkiewicz
  4. I Ain’t Gonna Paint No More! by Karen Beaumont, illustrated by David Catrow
  5. Row, Row, Row Your Boat by Jane Cabrera
  6. Pete the Cat: I Love My White Shoes by Eric Litwin, illustrated by James Dean
  7. The Seals on the Bus by Lenny Hort, illustrated by C. Brian Karas
  8. There Was a Tree by Rachel Isadora
  9. Jazz Baby by Lisa Wheeler, illustrated by R. Gregory Christie
  10. Bee-Bim Bop! by Linda Sue Park, illustrated Ho Boek Lee

pb 10 for 10 015Check out all the amazing lists coming out for this awesome event, Picture Books 10 for 10, hosted by Reflect & Refine and Enjoy and Embrace Learning.

The Grown-Up Joys of Reading Children’s Books – WSJ Essay

9 Aug

After reading the title of this article, “The Grown-Up Joys of Reading Children’s Books” I was excited to see what the author had to say, specifically in regards to what I would expect to be addressed, the diversity of children’s literature in the 21st century and how relatable it can be to both children and adults. Needless to say, that’s not at all what this essay is about, in fact the children’s titles referenced are classic titles that are not new by any stretch of the imagination – Goodnight MoonBedtime for FrancesThe Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe and The House at Pooh Corner.

I enjoyed how the author compared his feelings of the book as a child to his feelings about the book as an adult now sharing them with his own children, but expected to see references of more modern classics or popular titles that are so popular in this time period. Not to say that classic titles are “bad,” but to how newer titles can have just as lasting as an impression – authors like Kate DiCamillo, Christian Robinson, Peter H. Reynolds and Pam Muñoz Ryan and many of these authors and titles bring forward diveristy, tough topics and conversation starters that were never addressed in books published 50+ years ago. Considering the article starts with, “We are living through an extended golden age for children’s books…” I was just hoping for more of a modern look at children’s literature, rather than addressing the same authors and titles that have been discussed before.

The author of the essay, Bruce Handy, is publishing a book on the topic of reading children’s books as an adult entitled Wild Things: The Joy of Reading Children’s Literature as an Adult, published on August 15, 2017 by Simon & Schuster. I’m curious to see if he addresses diversity and more recent literature or if the whole book is focused on classic children’s literature alone.

(Unofficial) Top Ten Tuesday: Back to School

8 Aug

back to school

There are probably hundreds, if not thousands of “Back to School” and school-themed kids books. Here are a few of my favorite back to school stories to share with your kids! If you have other titles that you can’t live without, share them in the comments!

  1. Is Your Buffalo Ready for Kindergarten? by Audrey Vernick, illustrated by Daniel Jennewein
  2. Follow the Line to School by Laura Ljungkvist
  3. Pete the Cat: Rocking In My School Shoes by Eric Litwin, illustrated by James Dean
  4. The Kissing Hand by Audrey Penn
  5. Chu’s First Day of School by Neil Gaiman and Adam Rex
  6. Llama Llama Misses Mama by Anna Dewdney
  7. School’s First Day of School by Adam Rex, illustrated by Christian Robinson
  8. Ramona the Pest by Beverly Cleary
  9. Middle School: The Worst Years of My Life by James Patterson and Chris Tebbetts
  10. Wonder by R.J. Palacio
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