Tag Archives: library program

AtoZ Blogging Challenge – Real-Size Board Games

20 Apr

art-board-game-challenge-163064.jpgProgram Name: Life-Size Board Games

What: Imagine your favorite board game as a kid, now imagine that board game full-size and playing as the game piece! We’ve offered Life-Size Clue, Candyland and Chutes & Ladders. These have been a huge hit and although it takes a little planning, they’re a lot of fun to play and the kids love them!

Where: This program requires a large space – we use our large meeting room where we can stack the chairs and clear the floor to use. Masking tape is a huge life saver for this game and comes up pretty easily from the carpet.

When: I think we’ve mainly offered these programs when kids had the day off from school or in the winter when kids have extra energy that needs to be released in some way.

Who: We’ve only offered this program for kids from elementary school through high school. We haven’t tried this program with adults, but I think it could be a lot of fun for adults as well. It all depends on what game you chose to become life-size.

How: Check online, a number of libraries have offered this program and have how-to posts on how to implement this program in your own library. Otherwise, find the original board game, gather your imagination and a few basic props and get working! You can check my posts for how we created these awesome games!

Alternatives:

  • A lot of libraries have also offered escape rooms, which I would love to try sometime!
  • Libraries are also circulating board games and offering board game nights where they have a number of games available to learn how to play with friends and family.

a2z-h-small

During the month of April, I’ll be participating in the 2018 Blogging from A to Z Challenge. For this year’s theme, I’ll be offering you a library program plan with everything you to need to re-create it at your own library. Most of these programs we’ve offered in the past, others are programs I’d like to try in the future. I’m always looking for new inspiration and I thought you might be too!

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AtoZ Blogging Challenge – QWERTY Keyboard

19 Apr

arrows-blur-close-up-163130.jpgProgram Name: QWERTY (digital literacy)

What: This could be any number of programs about digital literacy – I was super excited I figured out a “Q” word library program! If you have a small budget and no access to a computer lab, there are ways to create children’s programs on coding without actually using technology at all! You can also provide a lock-in event before or after library hours to use public access computers if that’s a possibility.

Where: This program is some capacity needs some access to technology – whether that’s a computer lab of desktops or a pop-up computer lab with laptops or a program that uses tablets or coding without any technology at all – you’ll need a space for a small group to meet.

When: This program could work at any time of year and can be done as a standalone program or a series depending on what you have access to or what your community needs.

Who: We’ve done basic programming at our library with the staff we have, but you may be able to find a volunteer to help teach basic digital literacy programs using computer programs such as internet browsers, word processing and more.

How: There are a number of tutorials that can be found online for digital literacy programs. The first step is figuring out what type of program you want to offer and how many patrons you’re interested in having in each program. With one instructor, I would say no more than 15 people, allowing for time for one-on-one instruction as necessary. A basic way to get started would be to promote an online resource the library has access to – an easy way to offer digital literacy without needing to be an expert on technology.

Alternatives:

  • Coding for kids without technology
  • Coding with iPad apps
  • Online resource how-to programs
  • Microsoft Word 101
  • How to use Google Drive
  • and so many more!

a2z-h-small

During the month of April, I’ll be participating in the 2018 Blogging from A to Z Challenge. For this year’s theme, I’ll be offering you a library program plan with everything you to need to re-create it at your own library. Most of these programs we’ve offered in the past, others are programs I’d like to try in the future. I’m always looking for new inspiration and I thought you might be too!

AtoZ Blogging Challenge – Passive Programming

18 Apr

Program Name: DIY Programs

What: Passive programs are a librarians best friend when you’re short on staff, space and money. These programs can be super simple and easy to create and allow patrons the chance to participate any time they stop in the library, rather than attending a program on a specific day and time.

Where: These programs work great in areas that see a lot of traffic – to allow for as many people to participate as possible. We’ll often have something set up at one of our table displays, a table in the children’s department or it can even be at a public desk (reference or circulation)

When: You can offer these programs at any time of year – if you’re in a university setting you’ll definitely want something during the first few weeks of school to encourage students to visit and during finals weeks as students need a break from studying.

Who: These programs can be for any ages, but works best with kids who are already reading (so they can follow instructions) to adults.

How: Figure out what type of program you’ll offer, organize it and set it up, create clear instructions for patrons and then offer a raffle prize at the end of time period if necessary.

Alternatives:

  • Scavenger hunts are always really popular – many libraries will hide their mascot around the library for the kids to find. But you could also have people search for clues to find a “treasure.”
  • You can order a table-sized coloring sheet for patrons to color in.
  • Have a puzzle set out on a table for patrons to put together as they have time.
  • Start a story and ask patrons to add another line.
  • Have a card making station, see my previous post about what we’ve done.

a2z-h-small

During the month of April, I’ll be participating in the 2018 Blogging from A to Z Challenge. For this year’s theme, I’ll be offering you a library program plan with everything you to need to re-create it at your own library. Most of these programs we’ve offered in the past, others are programs I’d like to try in the future. I’m always looking for new inspiration and I thought you might be too!

AtoZ Blogging Challenge – Origami

17 Apr

rebecca-freeman-559314-unsplash.jpgProgram Name: Origami Folding

What: We’ve offered this program a few times for our kids and it’s always met with a lot of interest – but, I’d love to try a program with adults as well. Origami is so much fun because of the hands-on nature of creating something beautiful with something as simple as a piece of paper.

Where: This program does require table space for paper folding, so make sure you have those set up and a small group works best as they’ll need to be close enough to see the how-to and be able to do the same.

When:  This program could be offered at any time during the year which makes it a great fill-in program for a time of a year that is light on programming. Offering this program during a specific season might change what you create in class to reflect the season.

Who: As I said, we offered this program for kids – middle school specifically. But, I think this would be a fun program for adults as well. I think people like creating and this is an easy program to offer to create some really cool origami pieces.

How: Another easy program to have a staff member offer if they are familiar with origami, or see if you can find a patron who’s done origami and would be willing to create a program.

Alternatives:

  • I’ve seen a number of really cute graduation gifts with folded money which could be it’s own program.
  • There are a number of books that provide instructions on creating origami, so maybe you offer a class in understanding origami instructions and then let patrons fold their own creations using the aid of library materials.

a2z-h-small

During the month of April, I’ll be participating in the 2018 Blogging from A to Z Challenge. For this year’s theme, I’ll be offering you a library program plan with everything you to need to re-create it at your own library. Most of these programs we’ve offered in the past, others are programs I’d like to try in the future. I’m always looking for new inspiration and I thought you might be too!

AtoZ Blogging Challenge – Noon Year’s Eve Party

16 Apr

balloon-balloons-bright-796606.jpgProgram Name: Noon Year’s Eve Countdown

What: This is an adorable idea I borrowed from another library as a way for families to celebrate the New Year at a countdown at noon instead of midnight so that the little ones could be awake to celebrate. We’ve done this a couple of times and have created a photo booth area, a craft to make noise makers, music, a read aloud, dancing and more. But, I must say that the kids absolute favorite part is the countdown at 11:59am with music and a balloon drop! It’s pretty magical and the kids LOVE it!

Where: We host this program in our children’s department as the week between Christmas and New Year’s is usually pretty quiet – we don’t usually hold any programs during this time – except for this one, making it a big draw for families.

When: Although many of the programs I’m talking about during the AtoZ Challenge can be done at any time of year, this is a specific time – December 30th from 11:30am-12:30pm.

Who: We open this program up to families – gearing it to children in preschool and early elementary school as they most likely aren’t staying up until midnight for the real celebration.

How: Our children’s librarian hosts this party – it’s fairly easy going with a variety of stations for the kids to check out and then gathering everyone up for the balloon drop. The set-up is definitely the hardest part of this program, we usually go online to see how other people have created balloon drops and the disposable plastic table cloths are the easiest way to hold the balloons close to the ceiling until you’re ready to let them fall.

Alternatives:

  • We also offered a Lunar New Year program this year which is the New Year’s celebration of many Asian countries.
  • You could create a program based on how other cultures celebrate the New Year and create a bulletin board or table displays to show the difference.

a2z-h-small

During the month of April, I’ll be participating in the 2018 Blogging from A to Z Challenge. For this year’s theme, I’ll be offering you a library program plan with everything you to need to re-create it at your own library. Most of these programs we’ve offered in the past, others are programs I’d like to try in the future. I’m always looking for new inspiration and I thought you might be too!

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