Tag Archives: informational text

It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? 8/8/16

8 Aug

This week I read a couple nonfiction stories – I love what authors are doing with informational text for middle grade and young adult readers.  It’s so interesting and I truly believe that if they could incorporate some of these stories into the curriculum, it may excite more students to learn about history.

This week I read The Plot to Kill Hitler: Dietrich Bonhoeffer: Pastor, Spy, Unlikely Hero by Patricia McCormick about the possibility of a coup by Germans unhappy with Hitler in power and A Storm Too Soon: A Remarkable True Survival Story in 80 Foot Seas by Michael J. Tougias a young reader’s edition of a Coast Guard rescue of three men in the throes of a storm that was more than a little unexpected.

I also finally got to dive into Seraphina and the Twisted Staff and will most likely finish it tonight. And then it’s on to as many leadership books as I can read over the course of the next month or so as I transition into my new position as Library Director!!!!


imwayrJoin Jen from Teach Mentor Texts and Kellee and Ricki from Unleashing Readers and share all of the reading you have done over the week from picture books to young adult novels. Follow the links to read about all of the amazing books the #IMWAYR community has read. It’s the best way to discover what to read next.

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Top Ten Tuesday: Ten Books I Feel Differently About After Time Has Passed

24 May

Feel Differently About.jpg

I chose to stray just a little from this week’s topic because my feelings towards books usually stay fairly similar from when I read them and as time passes.  As I’ve said before graphic novels aren’t my favorite format for reading, but I’ve read many graphic novels that I really enjoyed and I love how versatile graphic novels can be – fiction, nonfiction, biographies and more can be portrayed so powerfully with a combination of word and illustrations.  These are just a few of the graphic novels that I’ve enjoyed in the past few years.

  1. Around the World by Matt Phelan
  2. Nathan Hale’s Hazardous Tales: The Underground Abductor by Nathan Hale
  3. Hidden by Loïc Dauvillier
  4. Space Dumplins by Craig Thompson
  5. Sunny Side Up by Jennifer L. Holm
  6. Zita the Spacegirl by Ben Hatke
  7. Ms. Marvel by G. Willow Wilson
  8. Nimona by Noelle Stevenson
  9. Roller Girl by Victoria Jamieson
  10. The Nameless City by Faith Erin Hicks

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created by The Broke and the Bookish

Top Ten Tuesday: Ten Books I Picked Up On A Whim

17 May

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Most of the books I read, I learn about through various blogs, Twitter mentions, and talking with colleagues, but every once in a while I’ll just pick something up as I ‘m assigning a call number to it.  Some of these are also ARCs that I received at ac conference or meeting.  And some I really liked others were okay, but I’m willing to give pretty much anything at least a chance.

  1. Sweet Home Alaska by Carole Estby Dagg
  2. Radioactive!: How Irene Curie and Lise Meitner Revolutionized Science and Change the World by Winifred Conkling
  3. Ten Days a Madwoman: The Daring Life and Turbulent Times of the “Original” Girl Reporter, Nellie Bly by Deborah Noyes
  4. All Rise for the Honorable Perry T. Cook by Leslie Connor
  5. The Scret of Dreadwillo Carse by Brian Farrey
  6. Young Man with Camera by Emil Sher
  7. On the Run by Tristan Bancks
  8. Me & Mirandao Mullaly by Jake Gerhardt
  9. I Don’t Know How the Story Ends by J.B. Cheaney
  10. Far From Fair by Elana K. Arnold

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created by The Broke and the Bookish

It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? 3/28/16

28 Mar

I feel like I’ve been in a reading rut, but I finally got some quality reading done this week and have a few books to hit up before PLA next week!  This week I read – Zombie Baseball Beatdown by Paolo Bacigalupi, a crazy story about zombie cows, small town life, and a really great look into immigration and undocumented workers.  I also read This One Summer by Mariko Tamaki – a graphic novel that won a 2015 Caldecott Honor award (although it’s definitely YA) and received some kick back for the decision.  To be clear, the Caldecott Award (like the Newbery) can be chosen from any book published by an American illustrator for children ages 0 – 18.  I also read Secret Coders by Gene Luen Yang another graphic novel, but this one is for younger children and has the beginning steps of coding woven into the story.  And finally, Alistair Grim’s Odditorium a fantasty/adventure novel that is a lot of fun to read.


I hope to read this week:

  • Pax by Sara Pennypacker
  • Radioactive!: How Irene Curie and Lise Meitner Revolutionized Science and Changed the World by Winifred Conkling
  • Far From Fair by Elana K. Arnold

imwayr

Join Jen from Teach Mentor Texts and Kellee and Ricki from Unleashing Readers and share all of the reading you have done over the week from picture books to young adult novels. Follow the links to read about all of the amazing books the #IMWAYR community has read. It’s the best way to discover what to read next.

Top Ten Tuesday: Ten Book I Enjoyed Recently That Weren’t My Typical Genre/Type of Book

23 Feb

Top Ten Tuesday

  1. Roller Girl by Victoria Jamieson
    I am not a huge fan of graphic novels; I’m a quick reader and I think I don’t spend enough time looking at the art, feeling as though it gets in the way. But I loved Roller Girl!
  2. The Tapper Twins Go to War (With Each Other) by Geoff Rodkey
    This is a great book for A Diary of a Wimpy Kid read-alike and I was not expecting to like it, although I see the importance of this style of book. But, it really spoke to me as a sister with three siblings – I thoroughly enjoyed it!
  3. Space Dumplins by Craig Thompson
    Again, another graphic novel, but this story played out on paper, like I expected it to in my head and it worked really well!
  4. Orbiting Jupiter by Gary D. Schmidt
    This book was put in my hands by a publisher’s employee at BEA with the caveat, “Read this with a box of tissues!” and for someone who is not a huge fan of “sad books,” I thought this book was extremely powerful!
  5. All Rise for the Honorable Perry T. Cook by Leslie O’Connor
    I wasn’t sure where Leslie O’Connor was going to go with a main character whose mother was incarcerated and I was worried that it was going to be too sad (see Orbiting Jupiter or that it wasn’t going to be handled well) but I shouldn’t have doubted… this book was great!
  6. Goodbye Stranger by Rebecca Stead
    I think every librarian has a classic book that they just don’t like – (one) of mine is A Wrinkle in Time and wasn’t a huge fan of When You Reach Me, but I really, really liked Goodbye Stranger.
  7. Greenhouse Glass by Kate Milford
    This was seriously all about the cover for me, I picked up and didn’t expect to like it because I’m not a huge fan of the cover, but fell in love with the mysterious story!
  8. Most Dangerous: Daniel Ellsberg and the Secret History of the Vietnam War  by Steve Sheinkin
    I don’t know that much about the Vietnam War, but this book really opened my eyes to the conflict that was happening both abroad and at home.
  9. Guts & Glory: The Vikings by Ben Thompson
    I wasn’t sure how this book on the Vikings was going to keep me interested, but I had to read it as party of the CYBILS committee and I was pleasantly surprised by how interesting the book was and how much I learned!
  10. The Boys in the Boat: The True Story of an American Team’s Epic Journey to Win Gold at the 1936 Olympics (Young Reader’s Edition) by Daniel James Brown
    My sister rowed in college for awhile, but I know literally nothing about the sport and really wasn’t expecting such an interesting story, but another book I really enjoyed!

  11. Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created by The Broke and the Bookish

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