Tag Archives: illustrators

#KidLitWomen

23 Mar

28336199_1826643144067275_698563104033662441_o.jpgIt’s Women’s History Month and you’ve got to take a look at #KidLitWomen and all the amazing information, resources, opinions and books by women in the kid lit world! Plus, you’ve got to spend some time on their Facebook page as women in the kid lit world have written a number of essays on what it means to be a woman in the field, on diversity, promoting female illustrators and so much more!

Get ready to spend some time as there is so much to learn and so much to share!

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Response to Anne Ursu’s Piece on “Sexual Harassment in the Children’s Book Industry”

12 Feb

Last week, children and young adult author, Anne Ursu, published a piece on Sexual Harassment in the Children’s Book Industry and it’s had people talking all weekend long about what can be done, what should be done and a call to action from authors, illustrators, bloggers and librarians to make it known that this type of behavior is unwelcome, unwanted, and unequivocally wrong in our industry.

I’m not a confrontational blogger, for the most part, I try to promote the books I like and be respectful of books that weren’t my favorite or didn’t work for me. But, in the past year or so, I’ve been thinking more and more about the platform I have and where I stand. And although it’s never going to get crazy here, it is going to get real and my posts will reflect the world we live in today, whether that’s creating a booklist for kids who have immigrated to the U.S., a list of books that show diversity in its’ many forms, or standing up for what I believe in, while being conscientious and respectful.

After reading the piece, I have to say that it’s not surprising, which in and of itself is a sad statement – that I expected that this happened, and that I just didn’t know the details. But, what makes me more sad, angry, upset, and frustrated is for all the people who have been sexually harassed who feel helpless. What a horrible feeling to have and then realizing that even if you did say something, nothing might come of it.

So where do we, the children’s book industry, and we as a nation go from here? This behavior, sadly, is not going to change overnight and I think, as many have pointed out, that it is time for the innocent bystander to take a stand and become an ally – to speak up when a casually sexual comment is made and say outright, that the type of talk/behavior is not acceptable. If someone is doing or saying something that you don’t like or is unwanted attention, speak up – be straightforward and make sure the other person understands that “no means no.” We need conferences, workshops, and conventions to have a strict sexual harassment policy in place and that when a complaint is filed, it follows procedure every time – no matter who it’s against. People in power need to learn that this is not the way they stay in power, that this is far from unacceptable and that there will be consequences.

If you want to learn more about the conversation happening, check out Gwenda Bond‘s tweets as well as Shannon Hale‘s, among so many others ready to stand up for what is right and just and good. The children’s book industry, although we want to believe is all sunshines, rainbows, and unicorns, is just like other industries and I think it’s important to remember to be realistic, but to also be hopeful that we have the power to make a change.

Just When I Think…

25 Jan

28263.jpgJust when I think the kid lit world can’t get any better, Jason Reynolds is interviewed by Trevor Noah on The Daily Show and it’s everything I expected and more. If you haven’t seen the clip yet, watch it… NOW! (I’ll wait)

http://www.cc.com/video-clips/avk8pe/the-daily-show-with-trevor-noah-jason-reynolds—serving-young-readers-with–long-way-down-

As he stated, Jason has written nine books and each and every one is amazing in it’s own way. What I love about Jason is that he is very aware of what kids think will be cool or uncool, boring or interesting and he capitalizes on making sure his books are never boring. He’s written everything from contemporary YA literature to Miles Morales: Spiderman and middle grade titles sure to hook even the most reluctant readers.

In the interview Jason says, “I am in service to young people. They are not in service to me.” And this is what I think is so remarkable about Jason Reynolds and other children’s and young adult authors and illustrators – they care so much for the kids they right about and for. They aren’t doing this work for fame and fortune, they are doing it to make sure their readers know that they are seen and that people care about them.

And as for me, if I can promote these amazing authors and illustrators and get their books into the hands of kids in my community, then I’ve done my part to make this world just a little bit better.

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