Tag Archives: fractured fairy tales

Book Review: It’s Not Jack and the Beanstalk

16 Sep

25753208I picked this book up fully expecting it to be in rhyme because if you don’t know, Josh Funk is the King of Rhyme. But it’s not, which was a complete surprise! I loved Jack’s voice in this book, not willing to have someone tell his own story andI perceived him to be much smarter in this version than in the traditional fairy tale where he thought that magic beans would be the best option when selling his cow and when he decided to steal from a giant (again and again).

In this story he doesn’t want to sell his best friend Bessie, the cow, Jack wants the magic beans to grant him a wish – to get his cow back. While Jack makes his way up the beanstalk, he’s invited to Cinderella’s ball and when he reaches the giant he really, really doesn’t want to die. I won’t spoil the story, but the giant is awesome and such a fun character. The illustrators enhance the story with a style that reminds me of television cartoons with bright colors and fun little hidden homages to other fairy tales in the illustrations, this is story you can’t read just once!

Twitter Booktalk (140 characters or less): Jack’s not happy w the narrator- he doesn’t want to sell his cow for magic beans, climb a beanstalk or get eaten by a giant.What’s he to do?

Title: It’s Not Jack and the Beanstalk
Author: Josh Funk
Illustrator: Edwardian Taylor
Publisher: Two Lions
Publication Date: September 19, 2017
Page Number: 40 pgs.

Advertisements

Importance of Fairy Tales

17 Aug

fairy talesFairy tales are one of my favorite genres to read, I love the magic, the mystery and the thought that these stories have been passed down through the generations. I love reading fractured fairy tales, different spins on old classics and modern re-tellings. I came across a few articles on Brightly that discuss fairy tales and wanted to add my own take.

Hear what Liesl Shurtliff, a middle grade author of fairy tales talk about the importance of taking fairy tales seriously, how fairy tales look simple from the outside, but when you really dig deep you find more questions than answers and maybe even some answers to questions you didn’t know you had.

Check out Melissa Taylor’s ten reasons why it’s important to read non-Disney fairy tales. Simple reasons like life lessons, more difficult reasons like cultural appreciation and scary in a safe context and more importantly – princesses don’t have dress codes that require them to wear pink.

And last (but certainly not least) – if you’re like me and believe that the fairy tales you know are mostly from Europe, you’d be surprised to find how many variations there are of the same story across the world. Lon Po Po is similar to Red Riding Hood in China, The Rough-Faced Girl is an Algonquin Cinderella story and The Talking Eggs is a Creole inspired fairy tale from Louisiana. You won’t want to miss this list of great multicultural fairy tales and if you stop by your local library, you’ll find even more great titles!

Top Ten Tuesday: Beauty and the Beast Retellings

6 Jun

Beauty-Beast-2017-Movie-PostersI know, Beauty and the Beast is far from the feminine ideology of the 21st century, but I love it. Maybe it’s because Belle is a girl that gives everything for her family and a bookworm to boot, maybe it’s because the Beast gives Belle an entire library as a gift – either way, it’s my favorite Disney animated film and I thoroughly enjoyed the live-action adaptation that was recently released. And I know, beyond the fact that the story is lacking in the feminism department, it’s also fairly lacking in the diversity department – if anyone knows of a retelling of Beauty and the Beast that is also diverse, please let me know!

For this week, I created a list of ten Beauty and the Beast retellings that I want to read someday, I love fairy tale retellings and as this is my favorite tale, I’m sure to enjoy these as well! And just to cover my blog, the above poster is copyrighted to The Walt Disney Company and I’m using it solely to promote this blog post (plus I love the details!)

beauty beast

  1. Beauty and the Beast: The Only One Who Didn’t Run Away by Wendy Mass

  2. The Beast Within by Serena Valentino
  3. Beastkeeper by Cat Hellisen
  4. As Old As Time: A Twisted Tale by Liz Braswell
  5. A Court of Thorns and Roses by Sarah J. Mass
  6. Beastly by Alex Finn
  7. Beast by Donna Jo Napoli
  8. Beauty by Robin McKinley
  9. Cruel Beauty by Rosamund Hodge
  10. Of Beast and Beauty by Stacey Jay

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created by The Broke and the Book

Top Ten Tuesday: Things That Will Make Me Instantly Want To Read A Book

18 Apr
  1. Middle Grade
    Middle grade is definitely my wheel house, I love middle grade novels because they’re not afraid to address the “tough topics”, but I like the underlying layer of hope.  YA sometimes is too dark for me!
  2. Historical Fiction
    I grew up devouring historical fiction – I loved Caddy Woodlawn, Little House on the Prairie, all the American Girls books and pretty much anything else. I’m not even particular about what period in history, I love it all!
  3. Diverse Characters
    Find me a book that discusses a culture, religion, disability, race, etc. and I’m happy. I think diversity is so important and I’m enjoying so many of the books that are becoming available that are diverse, but not about diversity.
  4. Magical Realism
    I love books with just a little bit of magic, in a very real world atmosphere. I always say that when a book starts with a map and ends with a glossary of words (usually in a made up language), I’m done!
  5. Realistic Fiction
    I really enjoy realistic fiction middle grade novels – I’m not sure exactly what it is about this specific genre, but I love them. I think I like that kids can see themselves in these novels and relate to these characters or be able to understand their friends and classmates. These books are powerful in creating a safe space for kids to learn.
  6. Fairytale Re-telling
    Tell me a story is a fairytale re-telling and I’ll pick it up right away. I love fractured fairy tales, retellings and everything in between. I think it’s because I already have a familiarity with the story so I get to enjoy the story that much more. It’s like visiting an old friend and not even needing to say anything, but just start up where you last left off.
  7. Coming-of-Age
    I enjoy coming-of-age novels because you can see so much growth in the protagonist. I lean more toward the younger side of coming-of-age and definitely more recently published books over the classics, but it’s a story arc that I enjoy and am always looking out for.
  8. Novels in Verse
    I didn’t read novels in verse as a child, but I really enjoy them as an adult (still in the middle grade age range), because they use language in such a strong way. You have to try really hard to create a novel in verse that is both powerful and accessible and those are my favorite.
  9. Mysteries
    I love mysteries – I grew up reading The Boxcar Children, Encyclopedia Brown, Nancy Drew, the usuals. I think the anticipation of trying to solve the crime and the adventure that is involved it what makes this genre work for me.
  10. Art
    I seriously considered an art history minor in college – I love art of all types, painting, photography, ceramics, sculpture, whatever you can find. If a book incorporates art (usually in a mystery), it will automatically get added to my TBR list.


    Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created by The Broke and the Book

Picture Book Month Theme: Fractured Folk & Fairy Tales

5 Nov

fracture folk & fairy tales.png

You’ll be seeing a lot of picture books on my blog throughout the month of November as we celebrate Picture Book Month.  You’ll definitely want to check out the website as picture book authors and illustrators will be posting an essay each day about the importance of picture books!  Check back daily for some great pictures surrounding a specific theme!

  1. There Was an Old Dragon Who Swallowed a Knight  by Penny Parker Klostermann
  2. Ninja Red Riding Hood by Corey Rosen Schwartz
  3. Crankee Doodle by Tom Angleberger
  4. Goldilocks and the Three Dinosaurs by Mo Willems
  5. Falling for Rapunzel by Leah Wilcox
  6. Interstellar Cinderella by Deborah Underwood
  7. Little Red Writing by Joan Holub
  8. Mirror Mirror by Marilyn Singer
  9. The Three Little Aliens and the Big Bad Robot by Margaret McNamara
  10. Mother Bruce by Ryan T. Higgins

 

%d bloggers like this: