Tag Archives: feminism

2018 Amelia Bloomer List

21 Feb

“The Amelia Bloomer List is a project of the Feminist Task Force of the Social Responsibilities Round Table of the American Library Association.” If you’re looking for some feminist titles for your little one – check out the Amelia Bloomer List, an annual list created to empower young girls and boys and show the strength of female characters in literature. The project is currently updating their criteria for books eligible for this list, with new content being published at the beginning of March 2018. Below, I’ve copied their Top Ten List, but they have a much more robust list available on their website for you to peruse. If you’re looking to create a diverse home library, definitely take some time to look over this list of amazing titles!

 

hist0043.jpg

Top Ten List

  1. Ahimsa by Supriya Kelkar (Lee & Low/Tu Books).
  2. Girl Rising: Changing the World One Girl at a Time by Tanya Lee Stone (Random House/Wendy Lamb).
  3. Hand Over Hand by Alma Fullerton, illustrated by Renné Benoit (Second Story).
  4. Malala’s Magic Pencil by Malala Yousafzai, illustrated by Kerascoet (Little, Brown BFYR).
  5. Noteworthy by Riley Redgate (Abrams/Amulet).
  6. #NotYourPrincess: Voices of Native American Women, edited by Lisa Charleyboy and Mary Beth Leatherdale (Annick).
  7. The One Hundred Nights of Hero by Isabel Greenberg (Little, Brown).
  8. Piecing Me Together by Renée Watson (Bloomsbury).
  9. Saints and Misfits by S.K. Ali (S&S/Salaam Reads).
  10. Shark Lady: The True Story of How Eugenie Clark Became the Ocean’s Most Fearless Scientist by Jess Keating, illustrated by Marta Alvarez Miguens (Sourcebooks Jabberwocky).
Advertisements

#blogbookaday: Dear Girl,

6 Feb

34605803.jpgSummary:  “From the New York Times bestselling author of I Wish You More, Amy Krouse Rosenthal, and her daughter Paris Rosenthal comes the heartwarming and inspiring Dear Girl,

Dear Girl, is a remarkable love letter written for the special girl in your life. Through Amy and Paris’s charming text and Holly Hatam’s stunning illustrations, any girl reading this book will feel that she’s perfect—whether she enjoys jumping in a muddy puddle, has a face full of freckles, or dances on table tops. This book encourages girls to always be themselves and to love who they are—inside and out.

Dear Girl,
This book is for you.
Wonderful, smart, beautiful you.
If you ever need a reminder, just turn to any page in this book and know that you are special and you are loved.
Amy and Paris” (Taken from Goodreads)

Review: A book to truly celebrate girls in every way shape and form, inside and out. In a world where you feel obligated to be something, do something, look a certain way, this book is a celebration of being you and one that is empowering and understanding and realistic all at the same time. The text is conversational and relaxed while the simple illustrations with textured patterns works perfectly to reinforce the message. This is a girl power book if there ever was one!

Personal Reaction: I knew that as soon as I picked this book up, it would be special. Sadly, Amy Krouse Rosenthal passed away just about a year ago and this book most likely is the last book that will bear her name as she worked on this one with her daughter. If you never saw her column in The New York Times, “You May Want to Marry My Husband” then get ready for the waterworks because it is truly a piece of love in a way only Amy could express. I don’t have a daughter of my own, but I plan on buying this for every single one of my friends’ girls as well as my niece and making sure I add it to my personal collection as well. I think this is a title that every young girl should have on their shelf, given to them as a gift from a loved one!

Title: Dear Girl,
Author: Amy Krouse Rosenthal & Paris Rosenthal
Illustrator: Holly Hatam
Publisher: HarperCollins
Publication Date: December 26, 2017


#blogbookaday (1)This is a new idea I’m trying on my blog this year that was inspired by @donalynbooks and @heisereads – to provide a brief review of a picture book every day of 2018. You’ll get a brief summary of the story, a review of the content, illustrations and theme, my personal reaction to the book and all the pertinent publication information! Enjoy!

Book Review: Funny Girl – Funniest. Stories. Ever.

27 Jul

26158710.jpg

My favorite picture books are funny picture books – ones that make you think and pay attention and are filled with moments where you can’t help but laugh out loud. And the other commonality? Many of them are written by men. It’s not a bad thing necessarily, but if kids read funny books mainly by guys, do they know that women can be funny too?

That’s the idea behind this anthology of stories edited by Betsy Bird from 27 women – many are children’s authors while others work in television, are artists, editors and more. The stories range from family disasters, friendship drama to growing up and many others that are just fun to read.

This is a great collection of stories to share with middle grade girls (and guys) who are looking for new authors to read and enjoy funny stories. It’s also a great book for reluctant readers as each story is only a couple pages long. I also want to point out that Betsy was very specific in collecting stories from a very diverse group of women, which is awesome. The book doesn’t have to scream DIVERSITY, it just is.

Twitter Booktalk (140 characters or less): “Girls are funny. Period. It’s time for the world to know it.” Funny Girl is a must-read book for funny-book-loving kids!

Title: Funny Girl: Funniest. Stories. Ever.
Editor: Betsy Bird
Publisher:  Viking Press for Young Readers
Publication Date: May 9, 2017
Page Number: 224 pgs.

Book Review: Here We Are

17 May

25226116I received Here We Are: 44 Voices Writes, Draw and Speak About Feminism for the Real World edited by Kelly Jensen from Algonquin Young Readers to review as an ARC (advanced reader copy), with a post-it note that simply stated, “The! Best!” which I’m entitled to agree with.

The premise of this book is offering 44 people a chance to “discuss” feminism in whatever way speaks to them – whether it’s by writing, drawing, speaking, in an interview, in a blog post, article, etc.

So let me give a little background about myself and then I’ll talk about the book as well. I’ve shied away from the term “feminist” for quite a while – it has a relatively negative connotation in many circles, which is unfortunate. I often felt, that personally, I wasn’t enough of a feminist, in that I believe that women (and all people) should be treated be equally in all aspects of life, but I never really acted on these thoughts and honestly kept them to myself for the better part of my life. As I’ve said before on my blog, I am white, cisgender, educated, middle-class and about as privileged as you can be without being a white man but more and more I look at today’s world and not only see the inequality that I face (as a woman), but more so the inequality that faces so many people who are different. And I believe that people can be different and still treated with respect and equality.

This book, written for a teen audience, does a great job of describing how feminism can differ depending on your background and your own story – what you bring to feminism. There are descriptions about what feminists believe, FAQs about feminism and then breaks down feminism into different areas to focus on – Body & Mind, Gender, Sex & Sexuality, Culture & Pop Culture, Relationships, Confidence & Ambition and Go yOur Own Way.

Each voice in Here We Are, brought their own story to the table and shared what being a feminist means to them – and not only are there women on the list, but the group of people talking about feminism in this book include a diverse group of voices some of which are men, women, different cultures, and people who identify differently than I do. By hearing/reading/seeing their stories, I learn more about the world around me. I learn about these individual people and I think the biggest take-away from this book is that everyone’s story creates their own view of feminism, with the belief that women (and all people) are equal.

As an aside: I’m sure that many will argue that there are too many views from this group and too few views from that group. But, when you only have a book with 44 voices, you’re not going to hear every single person’s story, because that would require a much larger book. I think the editor did a great job of trying to reach out to as many different types of people as possible and hopefully the reader can find themselves in the book and if not, feels strongly enough to share their own story online, with their family and friends or by writing their own book, if they so choose.

Twitter Booktalk (140 characters or less): Here We Are is a young person’s guide to what it means to be a feminist  in the real world from 44 diverse voices in today’s world.

Title: Here We Are: 44 Voices Writes, Draw and Speak About Feminism for the Real World
Editor: Kelly Jensen
Publisher: Algonquin Young Readers
Publication Date: February 28, 2017
Page Number: 218 pgs.

It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? 5/8/17

8 May

30753996.jpgI got a good amount of reading done this week, that is until I left my current book at the gym on Thursday… and although they found it, the person who picked it up, wasn’t back in until today, which means hopefully I can pick it up tonight or tomorrow – seriously put a damper into my reading life this weekend. Continue reading

%d bloggers like this: