Tag Archives: equality

36 Titles for Babies & Toddlers: Social Justice, Equality and Diversity

17 Jan

I just recently had someone reach out to me on Facebook asking for titles for a new baby/toddler about social justice, equality, and diversity. Basically, a way to flood her child’s bookshelf with books that make them a better citizen of the world. Now, there aren’t a ton of titles for your woke toddler (or baby) for that matter, but it’s important to showcase a variety of races, cultures, religions, disabilities and more on your bookshelves because it’s likely that your child will see people that will look/dress/act/speak differently than they do and what better way to first explore the world than cuddling with your family in a safe, happy environment? And if you live in a community that is very similar, then why not teach your child to respect and accept differences in people to be educated about the world them live so that whenever they do meet someone who is different they know what to do – treat them like a human being. So check out these (few) but great titles about social justice, equality, diversity and celebrating the differences that make us all unique!

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Board Book Titles

  1. A is for Activist by Innosanto Nagara
  2. All of Baby, Nose to Toes by Victoria Adler and Hiroe Nakata
  3. Counting on Community by Innosanto Nagara
  4. Everywhere Babies by Susan Meyers and Marla Frazee
  5. Fast and Slow by Britta Teckentrup
  6. Global Babies by The Global Fund for Children
  7. More, More, More Said the Baby by Vera B. Williams
  8. My Heart Fills With Happiness by Monique Gray Smith and Julie Flett
  9. Peekaboo Morning by Rachel Isadora
  10. Please, Baby, Please by Spike Lee and Tonya Lewis Lee
  11. Ten Little Fingers, Ten Little Toes by Mem Fox and Helen Oxenbury
  12. Ten Tiny Babies by Karen Katz
  13. Tinyville Town series by Brian Biggs
  14. We All Count: A Book of Cree Numbers by Julie Flett
  15. Welcome Song for Baby by Richard Van Camp
  16. Whoever You Are by Mem Fox, illustrated by Leslie Staub

Picture Book Titles

  1. All the World by Liz Garton Scanlon and Marla Frazee
  2. Bee-Bim Bop! by Linda Sue Park, illustrated by Ho Baek Lee
  3. Come With Me by Holly McGahey, illustrated by Pascal Lemaître
  4. Families by Shelley Rotner and Sheila M. Kelly
  5. Families, Families, Families by Suzanne Lang
  6. The Family Book by Todd Parr
  7. Glass Slipper, Gold Sandal: A Worldwide Cinderella by Paul Fleischman, illustrated by Julie Paschkis
  8. Golden Domes, Silver Lanterns by Hena Khan, illustrated by Mehrdokht Amini
  9. Green is a Chile Pepper: A Book of Colors by Roseanne Thong, illustrated by John Parra
  10. Happy In Our Skin by Fran Manushkin, illustrated by Lauren Tobia
  11. Hush! A Thai Lullaby by Minfong Ho, illustrated by Holly Meade
  12. I Wish You More by Amy Krouse Rosenthal, illustrated by Tom Lichtenheld
  13. Lola at the Library by Anna McQuinn, illustrated by Rosalind Beardshaw
  14. Most People by Michael Leannah and Jennifer E. Morris
  15. One Family by George Shannon, illustrated by Blanca Gomez
  16. Over the Hills and Far Away edited by Elizabeth Hammill
  17. Red: A Crayon’s Story by Michael Hall
  18. Round is a Mooncake: A Book of Shapes by Roseanne Thong, illustrated by Grace Lin
  19. Say Hello! By Rachel Isadora
  20. We’re All Wonders by R. J. Palacio
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Book Review: Here We Are

17 May

25226116I received Here We Are: 44 Voices Writes, Draw and Speak About Feminism for the Real World edited by Kelly Jensen from Algonquin Young Readers to review as an ARC (advanced reader copy), with a post-it note that simply stated, “The! Best!” which I’m entitled to agree with.

The premise of this book is offering 44 people a chance to “discuss” feminism in whatever way speaks to them – whether it’s by writing, drawing, speaking, in an interview, in a blog post, article, etc.

So let me give a little background about myself and then I’ll talk about the book as well. I’ve shied away from the term “feminist” for quite a while – it has a relatively negative connotation in many circles, which is unfortunate. I often felt, that personally, I wasn’t enough of a feminist, in that I believe that women (and all people) should be treated be equally in all aspects of life, but I never really acted on these thoughts and honestly kept them to myself for the better part of my life. As I’ve said before on my blog, I am white, cisgender, educated, middle-class and about as privileged as you can be without being a white man but more and more I look at today’s world and not only see the inequality that I face (as a woman), but more so the inequality that faces so many people who are different. And I believe that people can be different and still treated with respect and equality.

This book, written for a teen audience, does a great job of describing how feminism can differ depending on your background and your own story – what you bring to feminism. There are descriptions about what feminists believe, FAQs about feminism and then breaks down feminism into different areas to focus on – Body & Mind, Gender, Sex & Sexuality, Culture & Pop Culture, Relationships, Confidence & Ambition and Go yOur Own Way.

Each voice in Here We Are, brought their own story to the table and shared what being a feminist means to them – and not only are there women on the list, but the group of people talking about feminism in this book include a diverse group of voices some of which are men, women, different cultures, and people who identify differently than I do. By hearing/reading/seeing their stories, I learn more about the world around me. I learn about these individual people and I think the biggest take-away from this book is that everyone’s story creates their own view of feminism, with the belief that women (and all people) are equal.

As an aside: I’m sure that many will argue that there are too many views from this group and too few views from that group. But, when you only have a book with 44 voices, you’re not going to hear every single person’s story, because that would require a much larger book. I think the editor did a great job of trying to reach out to as many different types of people as possible and hopefully the reader can find themselves in the book and if not, feels strongly enough to share their own story online, with their family and friends or by writing their own book, if they so choose.

Twitter Booktalk (140 characters or less): Here We Are is a young person’s guide to what it means to be a feminist  in the real world from 44 diverse voices in today’s world.

Title: Here We Are: 44 Voices Writes, Draw and Speak About Feminism for the Real World
Editor: Kelly Jensen
Publisher: Algonquin Young Readers
Publication Date: February 28, 2017
Page Number: 218 pgs.

It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? 5/15/17

15 May

25226116.jpgThis weekend was all about gardening and Mother’s Day! I took Friday off, which resulted in me gardening for most of the day – not just putting in new plants, but pulling out old plants, taking garden waste down to the park and then planting the new plants and re-doing the stone border around the flower beds. And the thing is – I haven’t even gotten most of my plants yet (which just means there is more gardening in my future). Granted, I’ve ignored my flower beds in front of the house for the past few years, so this project is long-overdue!

Saturday it rained all day, so I did some errands, cleaned the house and took a long nap, plus did a little reading. And Sunday was spent celebrating Mother’s Day with my boyfriend and his mom – it was a lovely day, but only a a little reading got done Sunday morning.

I finished up Here We Are: 44 Voices Write, Draw and Speak About Feminism for the Real World edited by Kelly Jensen. I found this to be extremely thought-provoking and education, but in a really approachable way – feminism can often have a incorrect connotation attached to it and this book really opens up a lot of points for discussion that I really enjoyed. I’ll post a full review later this week. I didn’t get to crack open Love, Ish by Karen Rivers, but I’ll be working through this book during the week.


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Join Jen from Teach Mentor Texts and Kellee and Ricki from Unleashing Readers and share all of the reading you have done over the week from picture books to young adult novels. Follow the links to read about all of the amazing books the #IMWAYR

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