Tag Archives: early literacy

November is… Picture Book Month

1 Nov

PBMBADGE-AMBASSADOR-FBAll this month, I’ll be sharing my picture book love on my blog as part of Picture Book Month! I’ll be highlighting a different book each day that matches that day’s theme according to the 2017 Calendar and I’ll be sharing the link to each author/illiustrator’s essays on why picture books are important. These essays make for great reading each day and it’s fun to see the similarities and differences each person writes about. Check out the calendar below to get a sneak preview of this year’s themes and get ready to share some awesome picture books!

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25 Picture Books for Halloween

29 Oct

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  1. Creepy Carrots by Aaron Reynolds, illustrated by Peter Brown
  2. Skeleton Hiccups by Margery Cuyler, illustrated by S.D. Schindler
  3. Shivery Shades of Halloween by Mary McKenna Siddals, illustrated by Jimmy Pickering
  4. Vunce Upon a Time by J. Otto Seibold, illustrated by Siobhan Vivian
  5. Click, Clack, Boo!: A Tricky Treat by Doreen Cronin, illustrated by Betsy Lewin
  6. 10 Trick-or-Treaters by Janet Schulman
  7. Ten Orange Pumpkins: A Counting Book by Stephen Savage
  8. The Hallo-Wiener by Dav Pilkey
  9. A Very Brave Witch by Alison McGhee, illustrated by Harry Bliss
  10. The Little Old Lady Who Was Not Afraid of Anything by Linda Williams, Megan Lloyd

  11. Ghosts In the House! by Kazuno Kohara
  12. If You’re A Monster And You Know It by Rebecca Emberley, illustrated by Ed Emberley
  13. Go Away Big, Green Monster by Ed Emberley
  14. The Ugly Pumpkin by Dave Horowitz
  15. Plumply, Dumply Pumpkin by Mary Serfozo
  16. Room on the Broom by Julia Donaldson, illustrated by Alex Scheffler
  17. Los Gatos Black on Halloween by Marisa Montes, illustrated by Yuyi Morales
  18. AlphaOops: H Is for Halloween by Alethea Kontis, illustrated by Bob Kolar
  19. Mouse’s First Halloween by Lauren Thompson
  20. Where’s My Mummy? by Carolyn Crimi, illustrated by John Manders
  21. I Am a Witch’s Cat by Harriet Muncaster
  22. Pumpkin Eye by Denise Fleming
  23. Pumpkin Trouble by Jan Thomas
  24. Little Boo by Sephen Wunderli, illustrated by Tim Zeitner
  25. Pumpkin Soup by Helen Cooper

Director’s Thoughts #14 – It’s Been Awhile: Storytime

12 Oct

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b8a7c2491785eeb0c506cfc6f7c40d36--nurse-humor-medical-humorThis week I covered a co-worker’s storytime while she was away and after a year of being away from it; it was strange coming back. I did storytime for eight years as a children’s librarian and I think that I made a smart decision to move into another role when I did.

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Early Literacy At Its Finest

6 Jul

There’s a great article on the School Library Journal’s website about the positive effects of storytime on young children. Storytime began in the late 1800s and has changed drastically over the years from a time when children were expected to sit quietly and listen to an adult read books to today’s version of storytime that includes a wide variety of actions, senses, books, songs, dances and more.

I don’t think any librarian out there would argue that storytime is unhelpful to children, but there have been few studies to show the actual effects storytime has on PreK children. I think children’s librarians are also hesitant to say they are experts in the field as many don’t have a child development background and feel uncomfortable telling parents what they should be doing at home. New studies show that being intentional at storytime about early literacy skills makes a difference. Honestly, many of the early literacy skills I’ve shared with parents and caregivers in the past are things they already do, I just give it a name and explain why it’s so important.

I found this article to a fascinating read and really enjoyed learning more about research being done in the public library field. I’d love to see more research focused not only on early literacy, but on public libraries in general. We do far more good than people realize and we need to make ourselves known.

Preschool Expo

26 Jan

This is one of those program ideas that doesn’t work for all communities, but is really beneficial for ours.  Our library is situated in a suburban community of about 30,000 residents.  We have 20+ childcare and preschool options for families and for the past few years, we partner with our local Mom’s Club to present a Preschool Expo for one evening where we invite as many centers as possible to fit in our meeting room.  We also bring in other community resources to share their materials with families.

Families get the chance to ask questions, meet teachers and directors and see what makes each school special. They can also learn about the latest in seat belt and car seat safety, the programs offered by our Parks & Rec department and this year for the first time we offered babysitting.

Our middle school volunteers and our children’s librarian pulled out crayons and paper, books and toys and were available to babysit to allow parents to spend the time they need to interview the schools of their choice with out their  little ones pulling on them and getting bored.

We used to offer this program every other year, but we feel it’s a valuable resources and we’ve just started offering it every year.  With 100 people in attendance last night, I think it was a great educational resource for families and a great way to connect the Mom’s Club and the library together!

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