Tag Archives: disability

Top Ten Tuesday: New to Me Authors in 2017

2 Jan

I started reviewing what I had read in 2017 and realized that I was already familiar with many of the authors I read, but there were a number of really amazing debut novels this year, so I focused my Top Ten list on those authors – new to me (and the world).

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  1. Angie Thomas (The Hate U Give)
  2. Dusti Bowling (The Insignificant Events in the Life of a Cactus)
  3. Ellie Terry (Forget Me Not)
  4. Ibi Zoboi (American Street)
  5. Jake Burt (Greetings from Witness Protection!)
  6. Karina Yan Glaser (The Vanderbeekers of 141st Street)
  7. Nic Stone (Dear Martin)
  8. Karuna Riazi (The Gauntlet)
  9. Sally J. Pla (The Someday Birds)
  10. Sandhya Menon (When Dimple Met Rishi)

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created by The Broke and the Bookish

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Top Ten Tuesday: Books I’m Thankful For

21 Nov

thankful

This list could go on forever, so I tried to force myself to keep to titles that I’m thankful for that were published this year in middle grade fiction. I still had a lot more titles that I would love to highlight, but here’s what I came up with for my list:

  1. The First Rule of Punk by Celia P. Pérez
  2. Insignificant Events in the Life of a Cactus by Dusti Bowling
  3. The Perfect Score by Rob Buyea
  4. The Exact Location of Home by Kate Messner
  5. Forget Me Not by Ellie Terry
  6. The Vanderbeekers of 141st Street by Karina Yan Glaser
  7. Beyond the Bright Sea by Lauren Wolk
  8. Amina’s Voice by Hena Khan
  9. Refugee by Alan Gratz
  10. Auma’s Long Run by Eucabeth Odhiambo

What books are you thankful for this year?


Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created by The Broke and the Bookish

Picture Book Month: Courage

20 Nov

20An inspirational story about never giving up and working hard to reach your goal. Emmanuel was born with a fully developed leg and in an area of Ghana where having a disability was seen as a curse and bad luck. But his mother never gave up on him, teaching him to never give up and to continue to work hard for what he wanted. Emmanuel went to school, worked to help support his family and even rode a bicycle around Ghana to promote the rights of people with disabilities in Ghana. Emmanuel now works with educators, members in the government and organizations to help others with disabilities gain access to wheelchairs as well as reach for their own potential.
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