Tag Archives: disability

Top Ten Tuesday: New to Me Authors in 2017

2 Jan

I started reviewing what I had read in 2017 and realized that I was already familiar with many of the authors I read, but there were a number of really amazing debut novels this year, so I focused my Top Ten list on those authors – new to me (and the world).

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  1. Angie Thomas (The Hate U Give)
  2. Dusti Bowling (The Insignificant Events in the Life of a Cactus)
  3. Ellie Terry (Forget Me Not)
  4. Ibi Zoboi (American Street)
  5. Jake Burt (Greetings from Witness Protection!)
  6. Karina Yan Glaser (The Vanderbeekers of 141st Street)
  7. Nic Stone (Dear Martin)
  8. Karuna Riazi (The Gauntlet)
  9. Sally J. Pla (The Someday Birds)
  10. Sandhya Menon (When Dimple Met Rishi)

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created by The Broke and the Bookish

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Top Ten Tuesday: Books I’m Thankful For

21 Nov

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This list could go on forever, so I tried to force myself to keep to titles that I’m thankful for that were published this year in middle grade fiction. I still had a lot more titles that I would love to highlight, but here’s what I came up with for my list:

  1. The First Rule of Punk by Celia P. Pérez
  2. Insignificant Events in the Life of a Cactus by Dusti Bowling
  3. The Perfect Score by Rob Buyea
  4. The Exact Location of Home by Kate Messner
  5. Forget Me Not by Ellie Terry
  6. The Vanderbeekers of 141st Street by Karina Yan Glaser
  7. Beyond the Bright Sea by Lauren Wolk
  8. Amina’s Voice by Hena Khan
  9. Refugee by Alan Gratz
  10. Auma’s Long Run by Eucabeth Odhiambo

What books are you thankful for this year?


Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created by The Broke and the Bookish

Picture Book Month: Courage

20 Nov

20An inspirational story about never giving up and working hard to reach your goal. Emmanuel was born with a fully developed leg and in an area of Ghana where having a disability was seen as a curse and bad luck. But his mother never gave up on him, teaching him to never give up and to continue to work hard for what he wanted. Emmanuel went to school, worked to help support his family and even rode a bicycle around Ghana to promote the rights of people with disabilities in Ghana. Emmanuel now works with educators, members in the government and organizations to help others with disabilities gain access to wheelchairs as well as reach for their own potential.
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Top Ten Tuesday: Books I Want My Future Children to Read

14 Nov

There are so many amazing books available to kids in this day and age. It was hard to pick just ten, but I focused on ten titles that show a wide diversity in terms of culture, gender, race, ability, socioeconomic status and more. It’s important for kids to see all different type of people in books and I think these titles are a great place to start for middle grade readers looking for diversity.

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  1. Amina’s Voice by Hena Khan
  2. Crenshaw by Katherine Applegate
  3. Crossover by Kwame Alexander
  4. The First Rule of Punk by Celia C. Pérez
  5. George by Alex Gino
  6. Inside Out & Back Again by Thanhha Lai
  7. Lily and Dunkin by Donna Gephart
  8. The Misadventures of the Family Fletcher by Dana Alison Levy
  9. Out of My Mind by Sharon M. Draper
  10. Wonder by R.J. Palacio

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created by The Broke and the Bookish

It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? 3/27/17

27 Mar


finally finished Carmer and Grit: The Wingsnatchers by Sarah Jean Horowitz – it took me quite a while to finish and it wasn’t because I didn’t enjoy reading it, for whatever reason it just took me some time. It’s the perfect book if you have a middle grade reader who likes fairies and magic but is also interested in adventure and science.

I also sat down over the weekend and read two other books that have been on my radar for awhile – Home of the Brave by Katherine Applegate and Amina’s Voice by Hena Khan.  Home of the Brave is written in verse, making it a quick read, but a powerful one.  Kek travels from war-torn Sudan to America by himself to live with his aunt and cousin. He learns about snow, the grocery store and helps a number of friends along the way. It’s the story of growing up and holding on to hope. Amina’s Voice is a newly published novel from Salaam Reads, an imprint of Simon & Schuster that, “aims to introduce readers of all faiths and backgrounds to a wide variety of Muslim children and families, and offer Muslim kids an opportunity to see themselves reflected positively in published works.” And what I like most about this story, is that it truly is a diverse story, but at the same time it’s the story of a girl in middle school dealing with family, friends and school – things that absolutely everyone has to deal with. And although her family and her community come in contact with hatred that is all too familiar in this world, the basis of the story is a young girl finding her voice and that’s what makes this diverse read so perfect. Plus, I absolutely love how gorgeous the cover is!

This coming week I plan to read The Unexpected Life of Oliver Cromwell Pitts by Avi and maybe even jump into some YA books – The Lie Tree by Frances Hardinge and The Female of the Species by Mindy McGinnis that I thought about reading last week, but didn’t get a chance to dive into.


imwayr

Join Jen from Teach Mentor Texts and Kellee and Ricki from Unleashing Readers and share all of the reading you have done over the week from picture books to young adult novels. Follow the links to read about all of the amazing books the #IMWAYR community has read. It’s the best way to discover what to read next

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