Tag Archives: children’s literature

2016 CYBILS Awards

15 Feb

The awards have been announced! The CYBILS (Children’s and Young Adult Blogger’s Literary Awards) are announced on February 14th of each year. The award began in 2009 to “recognize the children’s and young adult authors and illustrators whose books combine the highest literary merit and popular appeal.” The categories include:

  • Audiobooks
  • Book Apps (Currently Inactive)
  • Early Chapter Books
  • Easy Readers
  • Fiction Picture Books & Board Books
  • Graphic Novels
    • Elementary/Middle-Grade
    • Young Adult
  • Middle-Grade Fiction
  • Nonfiction
    • Juvenile/Elementary
    • Middle-Grade/Young Adult
  • Poetry
  • Speculative Fiction
    • Elementary/Middle-Grade
    • Young Adult
  • Young Adult Fiction

And now, for the winners of the 2016 CYBILS, congratulations!

2016 CYBILS.pngAudiobooks – The Inquisitor’s Tale: Or, the Three Magical Children and Their Holy Dog
by Adam Gidwitz
Read by Vikas Adam, Mark Bramhall, Jonathan Cowley, Kimberly Farr, Adam Gidwitz, Ann Marie Lee, Bruce Mann, John H. Mayer, and Arthur Morey.
Listening Library

Board Books – Cityblock (Alphablock)
by Christopher Franceschelli, illustrated by Peskimo
Harry N Abrams

Early Chapter Books – Mango & Bambang: The Not-a-Pig (Book One)
by Polly Faber, illustrated by Clara Vulliamy
Candlewick Press

Easy Reader – Snail and Worm: Three Stories About Two Friends
by Tina Kugler
HMH Books for Young Readers

Elementary Non-Fiction – Giant Squid
by Candace Fleming, illustrated by Eric Rohmann
Roaring Brook Press

Elementary/Middle Grade Graphic Novels – Lowriders to the Center of the Earth (Book 2) (Lowriders in Space)
by Cathy Camper and Raúl the Third
Chronicle Books

Elementary/Middle Grade Speculative Fiction – Shadow Magic
by Joshua Khan
Disney-Hyperion

Fiction Picture Books – A Hungry Lion, or A Dwindling Assortment of Animals
by Lucy Ruth Cummins
Atheneum Books for Young Readers

Juvenile Non-Fiction – Some Writer!: The Story of E. B. White
by Melissa Sweet
Harcourt

Middle Grade Fiction – Ghost (Track)
by Jason Reynolds
Atheneum Books for Young Readers

Middle Grade Non-Fiction – Sachiko: A Nagasaki Bomb Survivor’s Story
by Caren Stelson
Carolrhoda Books

Poetry The Last Fifth Grade of Emerson Elementary
by Laura Shovan
Wendy Lamb Books

Young  Adult Fiction – Salt to the Sea
by Ruta Sepetys
Philomel

Young Adult Graphic Novels – March: Book Three
by John Lewis, Andrew Aydin, and Nate Powell
Top Shelf Productions

Young Adult Non-Fiction – Every Falling Star: The True Story of How I Survived and Escaped North Korea
by Sungju Lee and Susan McClelland
Amulet

Young Adult Speculative Fiction – Illuminae
by Amie Kaufman and Jay Kristoff
Alfred A. Knopf Books for Young Readers

Top Ten Tuesday: Books That Won an ALA Youth Media Award That I Haven’t Read Yet

24 Jan

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  1. March: Book Three by John Lewis, Andrew Aydin, Nate Powell (Coretta Scott King Author Book Winner, Printz Award Winner, Sibert Award Winner, YALSA Award for Excellence in Nonfiction for Young Adults Winner)
  2. Freedom Over Me: Eleven Slaves, Their Lives and Dreams Brought to Life by Ashley Bryan by Ashley Bryan  (Newbery Honor, Coretta Scott King Author Honor Book, Coretta Scott King Illustrator Honor Book)
  3. Radiant Child: The Story of Young Artist Jean-Michel Basquiat by Javaka Steptoe (Coretta Scott King Illustrator Book Winner, Caldecott Medal Winner)
  4. Sachiko:  A Nagasaki Bomb Survivor’s Story by Caren Stelson (Sibert Informational Book Honor Award)
  5. The Serpent King by Jeff Zentner (Morris Award Winner)
  6. Lowriders to the Center of the Earth by Cathy Camper and Raul Gonzalez III (Pura Belpré Illustrator Award Winner)
  7. Cry, Heart, But Never Break by Glenn Ringtved and Charlotte Pardi (Batchelder Award Winner)
  8. If I Was Your Girl by Meredith Russo (Stonewall Book Award for Young Adults Winner)
  9. Anna and the Swallow Man by Gavriel Savit (Odyssey Award Winner)
  10. Freedom In Congo Square by Carole Boston Weatherford and R. Gregory Christie (Caldecott Honor Book, Coretta Scott King Illustrator Honor Book)

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created byThe Broke and the Bookish

Top Ten Tuesday: 2016 Releases I Meant To Read But Didn’t Get To (Graphic Novel style)

10 Jan

missed 2016 titles.png

So I took this topic and focused solely on the graphic novels I want to read.  I’ve got a HUGE list of titles from the Nerdies Awards that I’d like to get to so I wanted to narrow my list a little and focus just on graphic novels.  As you can see there are titles for early elementary school age, middle grade and young adults – all on my TBR list!

  1. The Great Pet Escape by Victoria Jamieson
  2. Dog Man by Dav Pilkey
  3. Narwhal Unicorn of the Sea by Ben Clanton
  4. Compass South by Hope Larson and Rebecca Mock
  5. Lowriders to the Center of the Earth by Cathy Camper and Raul the Third
  6. Mighty Jack by Ben Hatke
  7. Snow White by Matt Phelan
  8. Paper Girls, Vol. 1 by Brian K. Vaughan
  9. HiLo 2: Saving the Whole Wide World by Judd Winick
  10. The Imitation Game: Alan Turig Decoded by Jim Ottaviani

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created byThe Broke and the Bookish

A Renaissance of Children’s Literature

29 Dec

I saw this terminology (or something very similar) on Twitter over the past week and it seems to continually be popping up after hearing many librarians, teachers, parents and kids enjoying soooooo many of this year’s books published for children.

Don’t get me wrong, according to statistics, the publishing world still publishes primarily white, cisgender, “traditional” characters, but I think that now, more than ever the world of children’s literature is not only asking, but demanding that every child will see themselves in the books they read.  The quote that so many people continually come back to is a quote that describes books as windows and mirrors:

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That being said, publishers have taken these demands to heart and although I don’t know that more books are being published about diversity, I think that the books that are being published are often times extremely well done and getting a lot of buzz in the children’s literature world. What I most appreciate are the books that are diverse without being about diversity.  You don’t need to scream diversity when writing these books, just be sure to include characters that are diverse.

Award committees both through ALA and across the blogging world are promoting diverse books as well which makes them even more wanted by kids, teachers, bloggers, librarians and parents. What I love about this community more than anything else is everyone’s passion for getting the right books into the right hands.  Every podcast I listen to, every interview I read, continues to amaze me.  Authors and illustrators in the children’s literature field are some of the most kind, humble and beautiful human beings on this planet. I’m convinced. They care so much for getting these stories into the hands of kids and their love for teachers and librarians shines just as bright.

Still not convinced we’re in a Renaissance? Check out the upcoming list of titles for middle grade novels coming out in 2017 from Mrs. Knott’s Book Nook. Check out the Mock Caldecott from Watch. Connect. Read., the Newbery and Caldecott Predictions from Fuse #8 Production and if you Google “best of children’s literature 2016” you’ll be sure to find lists upon lists of amazing literature published over the course of the past year.  Soak it all in and update your TBR lists!

2016 Nerdies – All the Books You Need to Read!

28 Dec

cropped-nerdy-bannerThe 2016 Nerdies are beginning to be announced and I’ll update the list as more winners are released through January 3rd. This is a great list of books that are often times overlooked for ALA Awards (not to say there weren’t discussed as possibilities, but did not win an award or honor).  The books are selected by you (and me) and anyone who wants to vote on The Nerdy Book Club website. The Nerdies are broken down into the following categories:

I’ve used lists like these to finalize my end-of-year reading goals as well as get a jump start on reading for 2017.  There’s usually a little bit of a lull in publishing during January, so it’s a great time to finish up 2016 books.  Also, mark you calendars for the ALA Youth Media Awards which will be livestreamed on Monday, January 23rd at 8:00 AM EST.  And don’t forget to check back to this post, as I update all the Nerdies winners!

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