Tag Archives: children with disabilities

Sensory Friendly Storytime Theme: Things That Go

16 Nov

Sensory Friendly Storytime- Things That Go (2)

I was surprised that I had never done this theme for my sensory storytime as that it’s such a popular theme for storytime.  So, without further ado, here’s my transportation theme for my sensory friendly storytime.  This storytime is done a little differently than my toddler storytimes, geared toward a smaller audience with a lot of interaction in the hopes of connecting with each and every child.  I use a great website called do2Learn to find my picture cards to create my schedule.  I loved this storytime and sadly only had one little friend attend, so I’ll definitely be keeping this storytime for another group of kids!

Opening Song: Open, Shut Them

Schedule: Picture Cards

Book: Little Blue Truck by Alice Schetle

Song: The Wheels On the Bus” (with shaker eggs)

Rhyme (Fine Motor): “Zoom, Zoom, Zoom

Zoom, zoom, zoom
We’re going to the moon.
Zoom, zoom, zoom
We’re going to the moon.
If you want to take a trip
climb aboard my rocket ship.
Zoom, zoom, zoom
We’re going to the moon.
In 5, 4, 3, 2, 1
Blast off!

Flannel Board/Folder: Tip Tip Dig Dig by Emma Garcia

Song: “Drivin’ In My Car” by Ralph’s World

Activity (Gross Motor): The Crazy Traffic Light” by Rob Reid

There’s a crazy traffic light
On a corner in our town.
It has the normal colors,
You know, yellow means slow down,
And green means go
And red means stop.
It’s all the other colors
That’ll make your mouth drop.

Chorus:
When you see a pink light,
It means hop like a bunny.
When the light is purple.
Make a face that’s funny.
When the light turns orange,
You should bark like a dog.
When the brown light shines,
You can oink like a hog.
When the white light’s bright,
You should give a loud roar.
When the light turns blue,
Fall asleep and snore.

One day the workers came
To fix that crazy light.
They tried to make it like
All the other traffic lights.
They spent a lot of money
Tearing out its guts.
They tried to guarantee
Traffic wouldn’t go nuts.
They put in brand new wires.
They worked all day and night.
The thought when they were finished
That they changed that traffic light.
But when they switched it on
After spending all that dough,
It flashed those crazy colors
That the kids all know.

(Chorus)

Book: Night Light by Nicholas Blechman

Closing Song: We Wave Good-Bye Like This

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Top Ten Tuesday: Ten Books That Celebrate Diversity/Diverse Characters

21 Jul

I’ve finally taken the plunge into Top Ten Tuesday and thankfully I didn’t have to rate these books, so they’re alphabetical. This week’s list focused on celebrating diversity or diverse characters and I chose to focus solely on disabilities as I feel books that feature children with disabilities are overlooked when discussing diverse books. These are ten books that I have thoroughly enjoyed reading and have taught me something about the disability they highlight and the people who live with these disabilities every day.  Hopefully, you’ll find one to add to your “to be read” list or give me a suggestions of something else to add to mine!

book9
A historical fiction story set on Alcatraz deals with the way people say disabilities before they were understood.  Moose knows his sister is different, but that doesn’t stop him from trying to catch a glimpse of the notorious Al Capone.

book7

Anything But Typical by Nora Raleigh Baskin is the story of Jason, a young boy on the autism spectrum who is more comfortable interacting with people online than in person and although he deals with issues just like any other kid his age, almost every moment is amplified by his reaction or the reaction of someone around him in reference to his disability.  This is an eye-opening story about people on the autism spectrum.

book4

El Deafo by Cece Bell is an entirely new take on disabilities in children’s literature – a memoir played out in graphic novel form.  It’s an extremely effective format that has provided us with some interesting conversation during book discussion.  We paired this with Cece Bell’s interview which gave the kids a whole new appreciation for her.

book8Joey Pigza Swallowed the Key by Jack Gantos is about a young boy who has trouble in school because he’s been diagnosed with ADHD.  His home life doesn’t help the matter, but Joey continues to strive for excellence even though it’s sometimes in a backwards manner.  Gantos does an amazing job of making the reader feel on edge and somewhat disconnected to reality in how he writes Joey Pigza’s story.  And the reader can’t help but want to help Joey make the best choices possible for himself.

book10A Mango-Shaped Space by Wendy Mass is about a different type of disability called synesthesia, which in this case Mia can see colors for every letter, number and sound.  Mia tries to navigate middle school while keeping her secret until her senses become so overwhelmed, she must share her secret with her parents.
book3Out of Mind by Sharon M. Draper opens the reader’s mind to the viewpoint of girl with cerebral palsy, she has no mental retardation, but she cannot speak leaving her with thoughts she has trouble expressing.  This book is near and dear to my heart because my aunt has cerebral palsy – she’s in a wheelchair and is also nonverbal.  Over the years, we’ve gotten better at communicating with her, but as my grandma read aloud this book to her, she was very adamant that she felt the same way – being trapped without a way out.
book5

A new book, Rain Reign by Ann M. Martin is the story of Rose, on the autism spectrum focused on prime numbers, homophones, and following the rules.  When her dog Rain (rein, reign) is lost during a storm, Rose knows that she must find her and do the right thing, even if it breaks her heart.
book2
Rules by Cynthia Lord is the story of a young girl with a brother on the Autism Spectrum.  She is constantly making rules for him to follow to make his (and her) life easier.  But, it’s her friendship with Jason who is paraplegic and nonverbal that she discovers that normal isn’t all that it’s cracked up to be.
book1
Wonder by R.J. Palacio is one of my favorite books of all time (I know, not an easy thing for a librarian to say!) but the discussion this book has created among kids, adults, families and more.  The power this book has had on conversation is absolutely amazing and teaches an amazing lesson for everyone who reads it!  Choose Kind.
book6
Wonderstruck by Brian Selznick focuses on deafness in a brand-new way with half the story done completely in illustrations which makes the focus on disability that much stronger.  I love the way Brian Selznick has created a new genre with his mixture of text and illustration and I think it works really well in this story.

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created by The Broke and the Bookish.

Sensory Storytime – Cars Go Vroom!

16 Apr

Sensory Friendly Storytime Theme-I don’t care who you are or how great your voice is, children definitely respond to singing.  Anytime I do a sing-a-long book, it works like a charm, kids who normally can’t stop moving, stop and pay attention, some start tapping their feet or clapping their hands mimicking the rhythm of the song, it’s a pretty amazing sight.  The kids I see at the Intermediate Unit have a wide array of disabilities – from Autism Spectrum Disorder to language development, visual, or other disabilities affecting gross and fine motor skills which means I have to be ready for just about everything when I visit these classrooms.  But, each time I visit, I come out of these storytimes loving what I’m doing and so excited that I get a chance to visit the kids in these classrooms!  The kids really took to The Wheels on the Bus with many staying very focused or answering my questions about the modes of transportation when they weren’t very intersted in other parts of my storytime.  Try those sing-a-long books – they really work!

Opening: “Open Shut Them”

Puppet Meet & Greet: Meet Tortuga (turtle puppet)

Book 1: Number One Sam by Greg Pizzoli

Transition: I’ll Take You Riding in My Car

I’ll take you riding in my car, car
I’ll take you riding in my car, car
I’ll take you riding in my car, car
I’ll take you riding in my car.

The doors on the car go open and shut…
The windshield wipers go swish, swish…
The horn on the car goes beep, beep…

Book 2: Sputter, Sputter, Sput! by Babs Bell / Five Little Monkeys Wash the Car by Eileen Christelow

Wiggles:Bananas Unite

“Bananas Unite

Peel bananas, peel, peel bananas,
Peel bananas, peel, peel bananas,

Chop bananas, chop chop bananas,
Chop bananas, chop chop bananas,

Mash bananas, mash, mash bananas,
Mash bananas, mash, mash bananas,

Eat bananas, eat, eat bananas
Eat bananas, eat, eat bananas

Go, BANANAS!!!!!”

Book 3: Down by the Station by Jennifer Riggs Vetter

Closing: “The Wheels on the Bus” with hand motions

Winner of the 2015 BoB!

1 Apr

stevesheinkinI don’t have any clever April Fool’s joke for today, but excitingly the winner of the School Library Journal’s 2015 Battle of the Kids’ Books was announced today!  Drumroll please….. the winner is The Port Chicago 50: Disaster, Mutiny, and the Fight for Civil Rights by Steve Sheinkin.  And of course, I haven’t gotten a chance to read it yet!  So it’s getting pushed to the top of my reading list for this weekend!

I’m excited that an informational text (nonfiction) book won this year!  The change is informational text has been drastic in the past ten years or so.  When I was growing up, informational text were usually very dry, text-heavy, thick books, but now they seem so much more exciting, inviting and accessible for kids, often telling stories that you never hear in history class.

I’ m also surprised it won because it was up against El Deafo by Cece Bell a graphic novel about a young girl and her life with a disability and We Were Liars by E. Lockhart, a YA suspense novel that hits you with an ending you never saw coming.  I would definitely consider this a great battle between three very different books and I can’t wait for a chance to read The Port Chicago 50.

Diversity Resources

3 Mar

There’s a lot of talk about diversity in children’s literature, but it may be difficult to actually find information.  I’ve found a few valuable resources (I’m sure there are a bunch more!) that make finding information a whole lot easier!

1.) We Need Diverse Books

An official campaign that began on social media to begin a discussion about the importance of diverse books for children.

2.) CBC Diversity (Children’s Book Council)

The Children’s Book Council works closely with libraries and publishers and has provided a number of resources on their diversity website.

3.) Day of Diversity (ALA & ALSC)

Although this was a one-day event during ALA Midwinter, this webpage has some great resources about the importance of diversity.

4.) Cooperative Children’s Book Center (CCBC)

Looking for statistics about diversity?  Look no further than the CCBC!

5.) SLJ Diversity Resources

School Library Journal has compiled a number of resources about collection development , interviews with experts in the field, and other recommended website to visit!

Let me know if you have any great resources that must be shared!  I’m always looking for new/more information!

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