Tag Archives: ALA

2018 Amelia Bloomer List

21 Feb

“The Amelia Bloomer List is a project of the Feminist Task Force of the Social Responsibilities Round Table of the American Library Association.” If you’re looking for some feminist titles for your little one – check out the Amelia Bloomer List, an annual list created to empower young girls and boys and show the strength of female characters in literature. The project is currently updating their criteria for books eligible for this list, with new content being published at the beginning of March 2018. Below, I’ve copied their Top Ten List, but they have a much more robust list available on their website for you to peruse. If you’re looking to create a diverse home library, definitely take some time to look over this list of amazing titles!

 

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Top Ten List

  1. Ahimsa by Supriya Kelkar (Lee & Low/Tu Books).
  2. Girl Rising: Changing the World One Girl at a Time by Tanya Lee Stone (Random House/Wendy Lamb).
  3. Hand Over Hand by Alma Fullerton, illustrated by Renné Benoit (Second Story).
  4. Malala’s Magic Pencil by Malala Yousafzai, illustrated by Kerascoet (Little, Brown BFYR).
  5. Noteworthy by Riley Redgate (Abrams/Amulet).
  6. #NotYourPrincess: Voices of Native American Women, edited by Lisa Charleyboy and Mary Beth Leatherdale (Annick).
  7. The One Hundred Nights of Hero by Isabel Greenberg (Little, Brown).
  8. Piecing Me Together by Renée Watson (Bloomsbury).
  9. Saints and Misfits by S.K. Ali (S&S/Salaam Reads).
  10. Shark Lady: The True Story of How Eugenie Clark Became the Ocean’s Most Fearless Scientist by Jess Keating, illustrated by Marta Alvarez Miguens (Sourcebooks Jabberwocky).
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ALA Youth Media Awards

13 Feb

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  • Newbery AwardHello, Universe written by Erin Entrada Kelly
  • Caldecott Award –  Wolf in the Snow illustrated and written by Matthew Cordell
  • Coretta Scott King Author Award – Piecing Me Together written by Renée Watson
  • Coretta Scott King Illustrator AwardOut of Wonder: Poems Celebrating Poets illustrated by Ekua Holmes
  • Coretta Scott King/John Steptoe New Talent AwardThe Stars Beneath Our Feet written by David Barclay Moore
  • Michael L. Printz Award – We Are Okay written by Nina LaCour
  • Schneider Family Book Award (young children) – Silent Days, Silent Dreams written and illustrated by Allen Say
  • Schneider Family Book Award (middle grades) – Macy McMillan and the Rainbow Goddess written by Shari Green
  • Schneider Family Book Award (young adult) – You’re Welcome, Universe written and illustrated by Whitney Gardner
  • Mildred L. Batchelder Award – The Murderer’s Ape written and illustrated by Jakob Wegelius
  • Odyssey AwardThe Hate U Give written by Angie Thomas and narrated by Bahni Turpin
  • Pura Belpré Award Author Award – Lucky Broken Girl written by Ruth Behar
  • Pura Belpré Award Illustrator Award – La Princesa and the Pea illustrated by Juana Martinez-Neal
  • Robert F. Sibert Informational Book AwardTwelve Days in May: Freedom Ride 1961 written by Larry Dane Brimner
  • Stonewall Book AwardLittle & Lion written by Brandy Colbert and The 57 Bus written by Dashka Slater
  • Theodor Seuss Geisel AwardCharlie & Mouse written by Laurel Snyder and illustrated by Emily Hughes
  • William C. Morris Award – The Hate U Give written by Angie Thomas
  • YALSA Award for Excellence in Nonfiction for Young Adults – Vincent and Theo: The Van Gogh Brothers written by Deborah Heiligman

Learn more about these awards by visiting the ALA website!

ALA Annual Conference (and what you can do when you’re stuck at home!)

24 Jun

This week Chicago hosts the ALA Annual Conference where librarians from across the country will come together for networking, continuing education and the chance to meet authors and illustrators while learning about upcoming new releases. And as much as I love traveling to the ALA Annual Conference sometimes it’s just not feasible. So what can you do if you’re #ALALeftBeind?

There are amazing continuing education opportunities that you don’t have to leave the comfort of your own home to participate in.  Check out WebJunction – a website built specifically for library training including self-paced courses as well as webinars across a wide-range of topics that librarians face.

If you can’t make it to the Annual Conference, check out ALA Online Learning many of ALA’s divisions host online learning on a variety of topics that interest librarians in all fields.

You can also check out state associations and local chapters who often have day-long workshops or conference based around a specific topic. These are most often more affordable and easier to get to.

And don’t forget to check out universities who often have continuing education opportunities. I’ve taken a class from the School of Library & Information Studies through the University of Wisconsin-Madison which I really enjoyed and they have a number of online courses they offer each semester at a low cost.

So even if you can’t make it to the ALA Annual Conference, don’t despair – there are plenty of other places to go to continue your education. It’s also important to attend continuing education opportunities for the networking aspect. Although I’m an introvert, it’s always refreshing to be around other librarians where I can bounce ideas off them and talk about library issues without having explaining it – they just get it. And that’s what I like most about this career, I am continually learning something new and it’s amazing.

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