Tag Archives: adventure

It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? 3/6/17

6 Mar

25665016I read two amazing young adult books this week. I finished up The Girl From Everywhere by Heidi Heilig – and fell completely in love with the story, the characters, the plot, absolutely everything. I definitely want to spend more time talking about this book, so I’ll be writing up a review (hopefully this week). I also read The Memory of Light by Francisco X. Stork – the story of a teen who wakes up in a hospital after a suicide attempt. It’s the story of what happens after a suicide attempt as the main characters comes to terms with her depression and the tools she begins to learn to manage it when she goes back to her day-to-day life at home. This novel really spoke to me, partly because the author uses his own experience with depression to write the story and for the importance of having a novel like this accessible to teens. These are two very different novels, but both were well-written and really great to read.

This upcoming week is going to be spent reading a few ARCs from Workman Publishing. I’m going to start with Carmer and Grit: The Wingsnatchers by Sarah Jean Horowitz. My friend at Workman described it as, “One-Winged faerie and a magicians apprentice solve a slew of faerie kidnappings.” It’s piqued my interest (and I’m not quite ready to start the book I got that came with tissues!). I’ve also got an ARC for Avi’s new book, The Unexpected Life of Oliver Cromwell Pitts. I’m super excited to start these books and want to get through them before they are officially published so I can start talking to kids about them!


imwayr

Join Jen from Teach Mentor Texts and Kellee and Ricki from Unleashing Readers and share all of the reading you have done over the week from picture books to young adult novels. Follow the links to read about all of the amazing books the #IMWAYR community has read. It’s the best way to discover what to read next.

It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? 1/16/17

16 Jan

I didn’t get much reading done, but I did read The Inquisitor’s Tale: Or, The Three Magical Children and Their Holy Dog by Adam Gidwitz. It’s definitely a very different book than anything I ever read, it was interesting and unique and fun to read. I love historical fiction books and art history, so I really enjoyed the story, but I wonder if kids will like it as much.

I had big plans to read over the weekend and instead spent time working on house projects – putting some pictures up around the house, organizing my junk drawer (not exciting, but necessary) and walking around Ikea getting some awesome ideas for my house (that I can’t afford, but would love to do). I also started organizing a bullet journal to try out for a couple of months, hoping that I organize all my meeting notes in one place for work.

I did crack open The Reader by Traci Chee and hope to finish it up this week.  I’m also hoping to get to The Sun Is Also a Star by Nicola Yoon that I got for Christmas!


imwayr

Join Jen from Teach Mentor Texts and Kellee and Ricki from Unleashing Readers and share all of the reading you have done over the week from picture books to young adult novels. Follow the links to read about all of the amazing books the #IMWAYR community has read. It’s the best way to discover what to read next.

Book Review: When the Sea Turned To Silver

27 Dec

28449045I just finished When the Sea Turned To Silver by Grace Lin this morning.  And I’m not surprised at how lovely it is.  Grace does an amazing job at integrating Chinese folklore seamlessly into a tale all her own.  This is the third companion novel to Where the Mountain Meets the Moon and Starry River of the Sky. And what I like most about these novels is that you could easily read them as stand alone stories, but if you pay close attention they are all woven together with characters, stories and locations.

Pinmei’s grandmother is taken away by soldiers of the emperor and it is up to Pinmei and her friend, Yishan to save her because without her grandmother’s stories, Pinmei’s world is in a forever state of winter.  Pinmei and Yishan travel to the City of Bright Moonlight, to the Sea Bottom and to the Emperor’s palace to save her grandmother all the while folktales bring to light more of the story than you would know otherwise.  The beautiful and lyrical storytelling is brought to life by gorgeous illustrations that call to mind the ancient art of China.

This would be a beautiful series to share aloud as I can only imagine the stories would be amazing to listen to and as I said you can read each book individually or read them together for an even richer experience. What I also love is that Grace provides a bibliography of where she found her stories, which leads me to believe that this is not only a gorgeous book to discover, but that it is also historically and culturally accurate.

Twitter Booktalk (14o characters or less): It’s up to quiet, little mouse Pinmei to save her storytelling grandmother from the emperor in When the Sea Turned To Silver by @pacylin

Title: When the Sea Turned To Silver
Author: Grace Lin
Publisher: Little, Brown and Company
Publication Date: 2016
Page Number: 370pgs.

Level Up: Pairing Video Games with Children’s and YA Books (Destiny)

1 Sep

Level Up- Video Game Book ListsEach Thursday this summer, I’ll be posting a video game and corresponding book list. This is just a fun, personal project that was actually the brainchild of my boyfriend who thought that A) it sounded awesome and B) that there are a lot of parents who would love to have some resources for those kids who would rather be in front of a screen than a book. I’m hoping these titles will appeal to both boys and girls who love gaming and who do love storytelling; they just need the right book to make them readers. Each list will include the Entertainment Software Rating Board’s (ESRB) rating for the game. I know that every family is different, but want to make sure this information is provided as I’ll be offering lists for games for younger kids as well as teens.

Destiny (Teen)

Big-Logo-Destiny-Wallpaper-HDDestiny is a first-person shooter set in a science fiction setting where the player becomes a Guardian to protect Earth’s last safe city where they yield the Light power to protects the city’s residents against a variety of alien races.  Books chosen for this video game include stories based in post apocalyptic settings where aliens are not uncommon and survival is key.  The books listed below are for teen readers and filled with action and adventure if a futuristic setting.

The 5th Wave by Rick Yancey
Cassie has survived the first four waves as the beings who look human kill anyone they come across.  The name of the game is survival and Cassie knows that in order to survive she must trust no one.  But when her brother is taken from her, Cassie must choose to find him herself or to trust Evan Walker who may just be able to help.  And she needs to decide soon, because the 5th wave is coming…
How I Live Now by Meg Rosoff
15-year-old Daisy is sent to visit her aunt and four cousins in England, but soon after she arrives, her aunt must go away on business and the next day a bomb is dropped on London.  Soon, the farm on which Daisy is staying with her cousins becomes a place more isolated as the world comes to terms with an unnamed enemy.  Without any adults, Daisy and her cousins must make tough choices in order to survive – stay on the farm or leave?
The Knife of Never Letting Go by Patrick Ness
Todd is run out of town – a town in which all the women have been killed and your thoughts are broadcast out loud for all the hear.  The cacophony of sound is almost overwhelming, but Todd knows that the town holds a secret.  Soon he is on the run with only his loyal dog (and the dog’s thoughts) to keep him company, until he comes across a silent girl.  Does she hold the key to find the answer to the secret Todd’s been searching for?
Icons by Margaret Stohl
Dol is one of four teenagers that survived The Day and are immune to the Icons powers.  The day the Icons came to Earth many people died, the power stopped and somehow Dol survived.  Soon the four realize they have more in common than they thought and their intense emotions which once got them into trouble are now a strength they need to survive.
Under the Dome by Stephen King
On a regular day in Chester’s Mill, Maine an invisible force field surrounds the town and separates it from the world.  Planes are crashing, people are separated from their families and no one knows what is happening.  A few unexpected townspeople bond together against a politician who will stop at nothing to hold onto his power in the town.  But the situation is dire because time is running out.  This book has also been adapted to television on the CBS network.

Video Game Booklists:

Level Up: Pairing Video Games with Children’s and YA Books (Grand Theft Auto)

25 Aug

Level Up- Video Game Book ListsEach Thursday this summer, I’ll be posting a video game and corresponding book list. This is just a fun, personal project that was actually the brainchild of my boyfriend who thought that A) it sounded awesome and B) that there are a lot of parents who would love to have some resources for those kids who would rather be in front of a screen than a book. I’m hoping these titles will appeal to both boys and girls who love gaming and who do love storytelling; they just need the right book to make them readers. Each list will include the Entertainment Software Rating Board’s (ESRB) rating for the game. I know that every family is different, but want to make sure this information is provided as I’ll be offering lists for games for younger kids as well as teens.

Grand Theft Auto (Mature)

GtalogoGrand Theft Auto is an open-world action-adventure video game where players can choose missions to move the story forward, work or side activities with a focus on driving in fictional locations modeled after U.S. cities.  Although this game has more adult and mature themes, it is popular with a number of titles to its name in a varied of platforms.  The books I chose for this list include adventure style books with lots of action and include both titles suitable for a middle school audience and young adults.

Double Vision by F.T. Bradley

Lincoln doesn’t mean to cause so much trouble but ends up being expelled from school and threatened with a lawsuit after a harmless prank is played while on a field trip.  That is, until a secret government agency provides Linc with a proposition.  Role play as one of the agency’s kid agents who went missing and they’ll make the whole lawsuit disappear.  Lincoln’s just a regular kid – not a secret agent, will he be able to hack it in the real world?

Gone by Michael Grant

You’re safe, if you’re a teenager – everyone else is gone, just like that.  No adults and no phones, internet, or television.  And soon the teens start developing new and dangerous powers as they fight for survival in a world with no rules.  Reviewers liken this story to Lord of the Flies with elements of Stephen King.  The first in a series, you won’t want to put down.

Loot by Jude Watson

March’s father dies in a fall during a burglary and March is seemingly left as an orphan until he is reunited with a twin sister he never knew he had.  Between her street smarts and the clues his father gave him, March and Jules are on the hunt for their father’s next heist before his rivals get to it first. And if they do, they’ll have enough money to do what they want rather than being stuck in an orphanage that feels more like a prison.  This is a fast-paced adventure story for fans of the 39 Clues series.

The Ruins of Gorlan (Ranger’s Apprentice series) by John Flanagan

A fantasy option for adventure seekers, Will has always hoped to become a knight, but he ends up as a Ranger’s apprentice, joining the ranks of the secretive group whose sole job is to protect the kingdom from the evil warlord and the beasts that follow him.  Will soon learns that his job as a ranger’s apprentice involves more skill and is more dangerous than he ever could have imagined.  This is the first in a series about a young man finding his way in a world of unexpected adventure.

Stormbreaker by Anthony Horowitz

Alex Rider can’t believe his uncle/guardian has been murdered, until he learns that his uncle worked for Special Operations M16 and was a spy for the British government.  Now, Alex must take over his uncle’s mission and after only two weeks of training, Alex is sent head first into a world he didn’t even know existed.  With action around every corner this is a page-turner you won’t be able to put down.  This is a perfect choice for young teens looking for a fast-paced, James Bond-style read.

Video Game Booklists:

%d bloggers like this: