It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? 5/22/17

22 May

25741324.jpgThis week I was able to to finish two books and start a third, which is pretty awesome! I finished Love, Ish by Karen Rivers and Just Fly Away by Andrew McCarthy and then I also started Finding Mighty by Sheela Chari. It was a good week of reading and I know that when I read more, I just feel better, so I want to make the effort to read for at least 15 minutes a day, whether it’s in the morning or when I get into bed at night. I don’t know how to explain it, but when I’m reading regularly, I feel more centered and calm… if I haven’t read a lot I’ll start getting more easily frustrated and upset about little things. I guess reading is my equivalent to meditation. This week, I need to finish up a bunch of ARCs because BookExpo is coming soon and I’m sure I’ll be getting a lot of new books that I’ll want to read as soon I get them! Can’t wait!


imwayr

Join Jen from Teach Mentor Texts and Kellee and Ricki from Unleashing Readers and share all of the reading you have done over the week from picture books to young adult novels. Follow the links to read about all of the amazing books the #IMWAYR

Blogging Challenges

20 May

I’ve been struggling lately with my blog – it started out as a suggestion from my boyfriend a few years ago and at the time I thought, “Who would ever want to read anything I wrote?” and since, I’ve come to enjoy sharing my programs, discussing issues and connecting with people around the world.

But now, I’ve taken a new job and feel like my blog has somewhat lost its purpose, so that’s where I’m at. My job now is much more focused on everything from large-scale projects to the mundane paperwork of running an organization… but that’s not as interesting to write about. I’m having more and more difficulty coming up with content for daily posts six days a week that won’t completely put everyone to sleep.

I’m hoping to start working on a calendar of ideas so that I’m not thinking about content everyday and having to write it up, rather I’ll have put some thought into it in advance (which is what I should have been doing all along). With this new position, I’ve had little time to really focus on what I want this blog to become and so that’ s what I’ve been thinking about lately. Library/Librarian blogs have somewhat of a small audience – mainly other libraries/librarians, some teachers and parents who stumble onto programming ideas and others who get here by accident. It’s not like a lifestyle blog or a Disney blog that has the potential for a much larger following. Or does it?

So if you’re a regular reader, comment on what parts of the blog you like and would want me to keep and I’m going to spend much of my summer trying to figure out where I want this project to go. Thanks for the input!

15 Picture Books to Celebrate Armed Forces Day

19 May

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  1. H is for Honor: A Military Family Alphabet by Devin Scillian, illustrated by Victor Juhasz
  2. Alpha, Bravo, Charlie: The Military Alphabet by Chris L. Demarest
  3. Memorial Day Surprise by Theresa Martin Golding, illustrated by Alexandra Artigas
  4. Night Catch by Brenda Ehrmantraut, illustrated by Vicki Wehrman
  5. Our Daddy Is Invincible! by Shannon Maxwell, illustrated by Liza Biggers
  6. Hero Mom by Melinda Hardin, illustrated by Bryan Langdo
  7. Hero Dad by Melinda Hardin, illustrated by Bryan Langdo
  8. Don’t Forget, God Bless Our Troops by Jill Biden, illustrated by Raúl Colón
  9. Tuesday Tucks Me In: The Loyal Bond Between a Soldier and His Service Dog by Luis Carlos Montalván with Bret Witter, photographs by Dan Dion
  10. Brave Like Me by Barbara Kerley
  11. Sometimes We Were Brave by Pat Brisson, illustrated by France Brassard
  12. Proud as a Peacock, Brave as a Lion by Jane Barclay, illustrated by Renné Benoit
  13. Love, Lizzie: Letters to a Military Mom by Lisa Tucker McElroy

  14. The Poppy Lady: Moina Belle Michael and Her Tribute to Veterans by Barbara Elizabeth Walsh, illustrated by Layne Johnson
  15. The Impossible Patriotism Project by Linda Skeers, illustrated by Ard Hoyt

The Big Nate Effect

18 May

BigNateBannerThis is something that has been going on for at least the past two years and it’s a phenomenon that my children’s librarian and I can’t figure out. We have at least two copies of every single Big Nate  book written by Lincoln Peirce. And there aren’t only a couple books in this series… there are over 20 books! And on any give day in our library you won’t be able to find a single copy of the series on the shelf. With summer coming, we’re talking about how many more copies we need to order.  Usually during the school year, the library isn’t quite as busy for elementary school age kids, but the summer brings them in droves and without any copies on the shelf now, we’re going to have a bunch of disappointed kids.

We can place holds and borrow copies from other libraries in our consortium, but it can take up to a week to get to our library and for kids that’s an eternity! So, we’re most likely going to by a few more copies to try and offer a booklist for Big Nate Read Alikes for when there is nothing on the shelf.

What books are never on your shelves? (Or do your kids read over and over again?)

Book Review: Here We Are

17 May

25226116I received Here We Are: 44 Voices Writes, Draw and Speak About Feminism for the Real World edited by Kelly Jensen from Algonquin Young Readers to review as an ARC (advanced reader copy), with a post-it note that simply stated, “The! Best!” which I’m entitled to agree with.

The premise of this book is offering 44 people a chance to “discuss” feminism in whatever way speaks to them – whether it’s by writing, drawing, speaking, in an interview, in a blog post, article, etc.

So let me give a little background about myself and then I’ll talk about the book as well. I’ve shied away from the term “feminist” for quite a while – it has a relatively negative connotation in many circles, which is unfortunate. I often felt, that personally, I wasn’t enough of a feminist, in that I believe that women (and all people) should be treated be equally in all aspects of life, but I never really acted on these thoughts and honestly kept them to myself for the better part of my life. As I’ve said before on my blog, I am white, cisgender, educated, middle-class and about as privileged as you can be without being a white man but more and more I look at today’s world and not only see the inequality that I face (as a woman), but more so the inequality that faces so many people who are different. And I believe that people can be different and still treated with respect and equality.

This book, written for a teen audience, does a great job of describing how feminism can differ depending on your background and your own story – what you bring to feminism. There are descriptions about what feminists believe, FAQs about feminism and then breaks down feminism into different areas to focus on – Body & Mind, Gender, Sex & Sexuality, Culture & Pop Culture, Relationships, Confidence & Ambition and Go yOur Own Way.

Each voice in Here We Are, brought their own story to the table and shared what being a feminist means to them – and not only are there women on the list, but the group of people talking about feminism in this book include a diverse group of voices some of which are men, women, different cultures, and people who identify differently than I do. By hearing/reading/seeing their stories, I learn more about the world around me. I learn about these individual people and I think the biggest take-away from this book is that everyone’s story creates their own view of feminism, with the belief that women (and all people) are equal.

As an aside: I’m sure that many will argue that there are too many views from this group and too few views from that group. But, when you only have a book with 44 voices, you’re not going to hear every single person’s story, because that would require a much larger book. I think the editor did a great job of trying to reach out to as many different types of people as possible and hopefully the reader can find themselves in the book and if not, feels strongly enough to share their own story online, with their family and friends or by writing their own book, if they so choose.

Twitter Booktalk (140 characters or less): Here We Are is a young person’s guide to what it means to be a feminist  in the real world from 44 diverse voices in today’s world.

Title: Here We Are: 44 Voices Writes, Draw and Speak About Feminism for the Real World
Editor: Kelly Jensen
Publisher: Algonquin Young Readers
Publication Date: February 28, 2017
Page Number: 218 pgs.

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