#blogbookaday: Twilight Chant

20 Jul

Twilight Chant.jpgSummary:  “A lyrical exploration of the transition between day and night and of the animals who thrive during this special time.” (Taken from Goodreads)

Review: A poetic story that teaches kids about crepuscular animals, animals that are mainly active during twilight. As a family walks home from the beach at twilight, they see deer, bats, fireflies, foxes and other animals creep out of their daylight hiding places to eat, play and explore in the low light.

Personal Reaction: I was blown away by the beautiful watercolor illustrations that perfectly mimic the twilight sky filled with oranges, pinks, purples and blues. And I loved how the took the last line of the page before to introduce a new animal on the page turn. With some additional information provided in the back of the book, this is a perfect bedtime story for your own nature lover.

Title: Twilight Chant
Author: Holly Thompson
Illustrator: Jen Betton
Publisher: Clarion Books
Publication Date: March 20, 2018


#blogbookaday (1)This is a new idea I’m trying on my blog this year that was inspired by @donalynbooks and @heisereads – to provide a brief review of a picture book every day of 2018. You’ll get a brief summary of the story, a review of the content, illustrations and theme, my personal reaction to the book and all the pertinent publication information! Enjoy!

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Tips & Tricks to Motivate Readers

20 Jul

Does identifying children as reluctant readers lead them to become more reluctant? Because if you hear something said about yourself enough, you’ll start believing it – even if it isn’t true. I know there are kids that don’t necessarily like to read or would choose to read from a variety of other activities.

In the library, “reluctant” readers are my favorite type of readers – the kids who are going to make you work that much harder to find a title that fits them perfectly. They won’t take just anything, you can’t give them the latest bestseller or the most popular book you happen to have actually checked in on your bookshelf.

These are the kids that take some time getting to know – what do they enjoy doing, what tv or video games do they like watch and play, their favorite genre (if they know) and what would make them open up a book and sit down to read it.

The best thing you can do is think outside the box, grab audiobooks, different formats (graphic novels, novels in verse, illustrated chapter books, magazines, etc.), and a large variety of titles – not too many to scare them, but enough that if they don’t like one book, they have others to choose from. And most importantly, don’t force reading as if it’s a chore, show kids that you’re willing to spend time reading and enjoy it and soon they  might crack open a book as well.

I just read an interesting Twitter conversation about this topic that started on author, Laurie Halse Anderson’s Twitter feed. Other librarians and teachers throughout a number of other ways to describe “reluctant readers” with words like:

  • selective
  • developing
  • high-taste

But my all-time favorite is undiscovered. Think about how powerful that sounds… readers who just haven’t found that just-right book yet. Undiscovered readers need support from the adults in their life, especially those well-read adults who can suggest titles that might just become the key that opens the door to the reading world.

What are your thoughts? How do you reach undiscovered readers and any general titles that are your first go-to suggestions for undiscovered readers?

#blogbookaday: We Don’t Eat Our Classmates

19 Jul

We Don't Eat Our ClassmatesSummary:  “It’s the first day of school for Penelope Rex, and she can’t wait to meet her classmates. But it’s hard to make human friends when they’re so darn delicious! That is, until Penelope gets a taste of her own medicine and finds she may not be at the top of the food chain after all. . . .” (Taken from Goodreads)

Review: Penelope is nervous about going to school and making friends, so when she walks into her classroom and all the students are children, she can’t help but eat them – they’re delicious! (Did I forget to mention Penelope’s a T-Rex?) But sadly, Penelope isn’t making friends because she keeps eating them. Soon Penelope understands what it’s like to be eaten and learns how to be a good friend. Because after all, children are delicious, but have friends is even better.

Personal Reaction: You know you’ve picked up a good picture book when it makes you laugh out loud while you’re reading it to yourself. I love Ryan’s work – his Mother Bruce books are just as funny as this one and so cute. You can’t help but smile when you read, “Ponies were Penelope’s favorite. Because ponies are delicious.” With adorable illustrations and an unexpected classroom pet that helps Penelope to see that eating her classmates is wrong, this book is sure to be a hit (and a perfect title to read for the first day of school!)

Title: We Don’t Eat Our Classmates
Author: Ryan T. Higgins
Illustrator: Ryan T. Higgins
Publisher: Disney-Hyperion
Publication Date: June 19, 2018


#blogbookaday (1)This is a new idea I’m trying on my blog this year that was inspired by @donalynbooks and @heisereads – to provide a brief review of a picture book every day of 2018. You’ll get a brief summary of the story, a review of the content, illustrations and theme, my personal reaction to the book and all the pertinent publication information! Enjoy!

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